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Intransitive verbs: In grammar, an intransitive verb does not allow a direct object.

Example: The fees of $10K was used to pay my son's school fee ; when converting this to an intransitive verb, using the verb "totals/totalling", it will become:

The fees totalling to $10K was used to pay my son's school fee. I understand totalling is an intransitive verb and I think $10K acts as an object there, if so, isnt that it contradicts with the grammar rules, that is intransitive verb cannot be followed by an object. Question: isn't that the $100K is an object?

Original Post
@Tony C posted:

The fees totalling to $10K was used to pay my son's school fee. I understand totalling is an intransitive verb and I think $10K acts as an object there, if so, isnt that it contradicts with the grammar rules, that is intransitive verb cannot be followed by an object. Question: isn't that the $100K is an object?

No, Tony. "$10K" is not a direct object. Not everything that comes after a verb is an object, for example:

- You are Tony. ("Tony" is not an object, but a subject complement.)

I will not refer to the verb "total," because I've already had my say on it here.

There are more more usual verbs than "total," like amount to and add up to, which also link the subject with the corresponding value, not with an object.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

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