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I have an instinct to go with the bold instead of "responded":

https://join.substack.com/p/domination

The book documents how “business leaders waged a strategic, ideological campaign at the workplace and within the community to recapture the hegemonic authority they thought the New Deal and the new unionism had so catastrophically disrupted”—this campaign was responding to a situation where attitudes were so anti-business that “one postwar survey” showed that “nearly half of all workers thought they would do as well or better if American manufacturing firms were run entirely by the government”.

Original Post

Hi, Andrew,

I have an instinct to go with the bold instead of "responded":

https://join.substack.com/p/domination

The book documents how “business leaders waged a strategic, ideological campaign at the workplace and within the community to recapture the hegemonic authority they thought the New Deal and the new unionism had so catastrophically disrupted”—this campaign was responding to a situation where attitudes were so anti-business that “one postwar survey” showed that “nearly half of all workers thought they would do as well or better if American manufacturing firms were run entirely by the government”.

I think you want to use the past progressive to provide some kind of background for the preceding verb phrase (waged a campaign...), while the past simple could indeed be interpreted as referring to a subsequent situation. Personally, I would prefer "this campaign was in response to..." because I don't like the continuous with a non-personal subject like "campaign" since it emphasizes the sense of an action.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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