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I use the bolded tense (not sure the term for it...it's sort of like a substitute for the PRESENT TENSE but I'm not sure its semantical implication or semantical valence) a couple times in my upcoming piece about lobbying:

And grassroots organizing is down to a science in many areas—many grassroots campaigns will know everything there is to know about voters and will deploy a scary amount of data in order to pander to voters in any which way.

See here another example:

But these things constitute more of a gamble for wealthy interests, whereas unelected lobbyists are a constant—lobbyists will always be 100% focused on the mission and will do their best with whatever cards have been dealt electorally.

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Hi, Andrew,

And grassroots organizing is down to a science in many areas—many grassroots campaigns will know everything there is to know about voters and will deploy a scary amount of data in order to pander to voters in any which way.

But these things constitute more of a gamble for wealthy interests, whereas unelected lobbyists are a constant—lobbyists will always be 100% focused on the mission and will do their best with whatever cards have been dealt electorally.

In those sentences, "will" is a modal expressing either inference or typical behavior. It is indeed correct if you want to express what those campaigns and lobbyists are expected to do or how they are expected to act.

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