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See here:

https://www.vox.com/2022/5/19/...2-replacement-theory

Not coincidentally, Carlson is the leading mainstream exponent of the idea that a similar process is underway in America: arguing that Democrats are using immigration policy to conduct “the replacement of legacy Americans with more obedient people from faraway countries.”

I'm not sure how exactly to explain my confusion regarding the colon between "America" and "arguing", but it seems like an odd deployment of a colon.

Thanks so much!

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Hi, Andrew,

Not coincidentally, Carlson is the leading mainstream exponent of the idea that a similar process is underway in America: arguing that Democrats are using immigration policy to conduct “the replacement of legacy Americans with more obedient people from faraway countries.”

I'm not sure how exactly to explain my confusion regarding the colon between "America" and "arguing", but it seems like an odd deployment of a colon.

I agree with you that the sentence is not a good one — there is no equivalence between what precedes and what follows the colon. The process is not arguing that Democrats are using immigration policy for the mentioned purpose; rather, the process consists of applying that policy. This could have been fixed by rewriting what comes after the colon so that it describes the process, for example:

- Not coincidentally, Carlson is the leading mainstream exponent of the idea that a similar process is underway in America: immigration policy is being used by the Democrats to conduct “the replacement of legacy Americans with more obedient people from faraway countries.”

It seems to me that the author wanted to connect "exponent" with "arguing" (by arguing that Democrats are using immigration policy that way, Carlson is the main exponent of that idea), but the colon is too far from "exponent" for this connection to be valid.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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