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Hello, everyone,

1) “It feels great to be on this ship.” - an excerpt from our local textbook;

G: Wow, it feels great to be on this ship, Dad.
M: I feel the same, Sora. Here are our seats, 20A and 20B.
G: Yeah. Do you mind if I take the window seat? I like to see the view outside.

2) “It felt strange to be back in my old school.”
3) “It felt as though he had run a marathon.”

2) and 3) above ; excerpts from

https://www.oxfordlearnersdict...rican_english/feel_1

“linking verb (not used in the progressive tenses) to give you a particular feeling or impression (+ adj.)”

By the way I have following inquiries;

1. If the three sentences have the same construction in common?

2. How to parse the grammatical functions of ‘it’ and ‘to infinitive/as though clause’ - that is, the construction of ‘preparatory it + exrtraposed subject’ or the one of ‘empty subject it + complement clause’?

I personally think the patterns of three sentences above as follows;

- 1), 2) above; empty subject ‘it’ + linking verb + ‘to infinitive’ complementing the
preceding adjective – ‘great, strange’ - with similar meaning to “it feels great
when(because) I am on this ship.”

- 3) above; empty subject ‘it’ + linking verb + ‘as though clause’ complementing the preceding verb ‘felt’.

I would appreciate it, if you kindly share opinions.

Last edited by deepcosmos
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Hi, Deepcosmos and Raymond,

@deepcosmos posted:

1) “It feels great to be on this ship.”
2) “It felt strange to be back in my old school.”
3) “It felt as though he had run a marathon.”

I have following inquiries;

1. If the three sentences have the same construction in common?

2. How to parse the grammatical functions of ‘it’ and ‘to infinitive/as though clause’ - that is, the construction of ‘preparatory it + extraposed subject’ or the one of ‘empty subject it + complement clause’?

I personally think the patterns of three sentences above as follows;

- 1), 2) above; empty subject ‘it’ + linking verb + ‘to infinitive’ complementing the preceding adjective – ‘great, strange’ - with similar meaning to “it feels great when (because) I am on this ship.”

- 3) above; empty subject ‘it’ + linking verb + ‘as though clause’ complementing the preceding verb ‘felt’.

I think we have an anticipatory "it" in (1) and (2). Actually, though we get less idiomatic sentences, we can place the infinitival subject at the beginning:

1a) To be on this ship feels great.
2a) To be back in my old school felt strange.

I agree with both of you that in (3) we have a situational or experiential "it" and a subject complement. "It" refers to "what he felt."

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

I think we have an anticipatory "it" in (1) and (2). Actually, though we get less idiomatic sentences, we can place the infinitival subject at the beginning:

1a) To be on this ship feels great.
2a) To be back in my old school felt strange.

I agree with both of you that in (3) we have a situational or experiential "it" and a subject complement. "It" refers to "what he felt."

Hi, Gustavo, sincerely appreciate your fine explanation as usual.

I think we have an anticipatory "it" in (1) and (2). Actually, though we get less idiomatic sentences, we can place the infinitival subject at the beginning:

1a) To be on this ship feels great.
2a) To be back in my old school felt strange.

I concur. For what it's worth—grammatical transformations aside—the meaning of such expressions can be paraphrased like this:

  • Being on this ship makes me feel great.
  • Being back in my old school made me feel strange.
@deepcosmos posted:

3) “It felt as though he had run a marathon.”

In this sentence, which means "It felt to him as though he had run a marathon," "it" could be replaced with "he": "He felt as though he had run a marathon." In "as though" sentences, "though" means "if," and reduction is involved.

  • It felt (to him) as (it would have felt [to him]) if he had run a marathon.

I concur. For what it's worth—grammatical transformations aside—the meaning of such expressions can be paraphrased like this:

  • Being on this ship makes me feel great.
  • Being back in my old school made me feel strange.

In this sentence, which means "It felt to him as though he had run a marathon," "it" could be replaced with "he": "He felt as though he had run a marathon." In "as though" sentences, "though" means "if," and reduction is involved.

  • It felt (to him) as (it would have felt [to him]) if he had run a marathon.

Hi, David, really appreciate. Where else could I be explained such a nice explanation other than G/ Exchange?

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