Hi!  I happened to learn this strucure: it is past time to.  

 

(1) It is past time to update your resume.

 

I was wondering about this structure.  Is the meaning (more or less) the same as the structure "It is (high) time to/that"?  Is it possible to paraphrase (1) to (2) below, using that-clause just like "It is (high) time that"?

 

(2)  It is past time that you updated your resume.

 

Which part of speech is the "past" in this structure?

 

I would appreciate it if you could kindly give me information about "it is past time to."  Thank you so much!

Original Post
yasukotta posted:

(1) It is past time to update your resume. [. . .]
(2)  It is past time that you updated your resume.

Hi, Yasukotta,

The structure "It is past time to [infinitive clause]" is a variation of "It is time to [infinitive clause]." It is not a variation of "It is (high) time that [past tense clause]." Indeed, your example (2) does not work.

yasukotta posted:
Which part of speech is the "past" in this structure?

"Past" is a preposition in "It is past time to update your resume," as can be seen by the fact that "the" is sometimes used in the construction: "It is past the time to update your resume." It is more common for "the" not to be used, however.

yasukotta posted:

Is it possible to paraphrase (1) to (3) below?

(3) To update/Updating your resume is past time.

Hi, Yasukotta,

Unfortunately, that paraphrase does not work. What your attempt to use (3) as a paraphrase of (1) tells me is that you thought (1) involved extraposition, with "it" filling in for the infinitival clause "to update your resume."

In reality, "it" is meaningless in (1), or purely situational. "It" is identified with the time that is past (the) time to update "your" resume. The infinitival clause "to update your resume" actually modifies "time"--cf.: "update-your-resume time."

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