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Hi, hero,

@hero posted:

Jim didn't like a long meeting [so/because] he could not bear to listen to the boring presentation.

Where have you taken this sentence from? With the verb "like" in the present or past simple we use generic nouns:

Jim didn't like long meetings

or nouns with a definite reference:

Jim didn't like the long meeting

With "a long meeting," I'd use "want," and the right linker would be "because":

- Jim didn't want a long meeting because he could not bear to listen to the boring presentation. (reason)

Notice that "so" could work with this other verb form in the adverbial clause:

- Jim didn't want a long meeting so he would not have to (bear to) listen to the boring presentation. (purpose)

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor
@hero posted:

Can I say "Jim didn't like long meetings so he could not bear to listen to the boring presentation"?

Yes. Unlike "wanted," which can point to the future within the past (he wanted to have a meeting/meetings), "liked" expresses a habitual past, and then "so he could not bear to listen" could only be used to express result. This is another possible sentence:

- Jim didn't like long meetings so (as a result) he left in the middle of the boring presentation.

Note 1: couldn't bear can also be followed by V-ing (couldn't bear listening to...)

Note 2: Your comment further above should have been It is very informative.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

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