Hi,

I can't understand the role of "just" in these two sentences.

He is a just man.

He is just a man.

Is just a different speech part in this sentences?

Original Post
mimichan posted:
Is just a different speech part in this these sentences?

Yes, Mimichan, "just" is an adverb in one of the sentences and an adjective in the other. Can you tell in which sentence it is an adjective and in which it's an adverb?

David, Moderator posted:
mimichan posted:
Is just a different speech part in this these sentences?

Yes, Mimichan, "just" is an adverb in one of the sentences and an adjective in the other. Can you tell in which sentence it is an adjective and in which it's an adverb?

Thank you!

I think the first one is an adjective, but I don't understand why it is an adverb in the second one.

Hi, Mimichan,

You're right that "just" is an adjective in the first sentence, as it modifies the noun "man":

1. He is a just man.

"just" is an adverb when it is equivalent to "only":

2. He is just a man = He is only a man.

Now, the question is why "just" is an adverb in the second sentence. By definition, adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. They sometimes modify whole sentences. We'll see what David says, but I think that in this case "just" modifies the verb phrase "is (a man)." Notice that "just" comes after the verb "be" but will precede other verbs, in which case the verb-adverbial modifier relationship becomes clearer:

3. He just behaves like a man, but is actually just a boy.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor
Gustavo, Contributor posted:

Hi, Mimichan,

You're right that "just" is an adjective in the first sentence, as it modifies the noun "man":

1. He is a just man.

"just" is an adverb when it is equivalent to "only":

2. He is just a man = He is only a man.

Now, the question is why "just" is an adverb in the second sentence. By definition, adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. They sometimes modify whole sentences. We'll see what David says, but I think that in this case "just" modifies the verb phrase "is (a man)." Notice that "just" comes after the verb "be" but will precede other verbs, in which case the verb-adverbial modifier relationship becomes clearer:

3. He just behaves like a man, but is actually just a boy.

Thank you!!!

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