I have the impression that almost all English native speakers use the expression not a) but b) when they launch a meeting, presentation, etc.

a) Let's start.
b) Let's get started.

I have two questions.
1) Is a) a correct sentence?
2) The reason for the use of the verb "get" in b)?

I suspect "get" makes the voice of the sentence passive, so that allows the speaker to omit an objective.

Thanks.



Original Post

Hello, Ken. Welcome back!

ken posted:

I have the impression that almost all English native speakers use the expression not a) but b) when they launch a meeting, presentation, etc.

a) Let's start.
b) Let's get started.

Yes, that's true, though we do sometimes use "Let's start," even in that context. Generally speaking, however, instead of "Let's start" we use "Let's begin."

ken posted:

I have two questions.
1) Is a) a correct sentence?

Yes, sentence (a) is correct.

ken posted:

2) The reason for the use of the verb "get" in b)?

I suspect "get" makes the voice of the sentence passive, so that allows the speaker to omit an objective.

No, "get" is not a passive auxiliary in "Let's get started," which is not even a sentence in the passive voice. Rather, "get" is a copula (linking verb) there, similar in meaning to "become," and "started" has an adjectival meaning. The sentence is saying, in effect, "Let's become started."

"Let's become started."
So, essentially, the idea behind the sentence b) is   "I am started."?  (Or solicitation for that state.)


ken posted:

"Let's become started."
So, essentially, the idea behind the sentence b) is   "I am started."?  (Or solicitation for that state.)

No, it is "solicitation for that state."

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