Skip to main content

Hello, everyone,

p.65, First Impressions

“You have to pay close attention to someone's normal pattern in order to notice a deviation from it when he or she lies. Sometimes the variation is as subtle as a pause. Other times it's obvious and abrupt. I recently saw a news interview with an acquaintance who I was certain was going to lie about a few particularly sensitive issues, and lie she did. During most of her interview she was calm and direct, but when she started lying, her manner changed dramatically: she threw her head back, laughed in "dis- belief," and shook her head back and forth. It's true the questions dealt with very personal issues, but I've found that in general, if a person is telling the truth her manner will not change significantly or abruptly. But you won't see those changes if you're not watching carefully.”

About the underlined part, I think the original sentence is 1) “She lied.” and 2) “She did lie.“ with the main verb stressed. However, I don’t understand how 2) could be inverted into 3) ”lie she did.“ Do the natives sometimes invert a bare infinitive at the front to focus it?

* source;

https://vdoc.pub/documents/rea...nyplace-6ihc4ld9j0g0

Would appreciate on your explanation.

Last edited by deepcosmos
Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

@deepcosmos posted:


“. . . I recently saw a news interview with an acquaintance who I was certain was going to lie about a few particularly sensitive issues, and lie she did. . . .”

About the underlined part, I think the original sentence is 1) “She lied.” and 2) “She did lie.“ with the main verb stressed. However, I don’t understand how 2) could be inverted into 3) ”lie she did.“ Do the natives sometimes invert a bare infinitive at the front to focus it?



Hi, deepcosmos—You are right that "Lie she did" derives from "She lied" and "She did lie." This is called VP fronting, or topicalization of the verb phrase.

You are familiar with fronting, or topicalization, in sentences like "Chocolate(,) I like" (--> "I like chocolate) and "How much he knows, I could not say."

VP fronting is less common, but is possible. To be felicitous, the verb is usually found earlier in the sentence. "Do"-support or a modal is generally used.

  • I wanted to ski, and ski I did.
  • I have long wanted to do it, and do it I shall.
Last edited by David, Moderator

Hi, deepcosmos—You are right that "Lie she did" derives from "She lied" and "She did lie." This is called VP fronting, or topicalization of the verb phrase.

You are familiar with fronting, or topicalization, in sentences like "Chocolate(,) I like" (--> "I like chocolate) and "How much he knows, I could not say."

VP fronting is less common, but is possible. To be felicitous, the verb is usually found earlier in the sentence. "Do"-support or a modal is generally used.

  • I wanted to ski, and ski I did.
  • I have long wanted to do it, and do it I shall.

Sincerely appreciate your support as always, David.

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×