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Hi!. This forum may not be the right place to ask this question since it is not a grammar question but rather a question about literary devices. Feel free to remove/delete my question if you feel that it is not suitable for this forum.

What I am wondering about is the use of anaphora and tricolon, and whether a part of sentence can be both an anaphora and a tricolon or not. The following can be found in one of the texts my students have worked with: “we defend the man in the street, the farmer in the fields and the fisherman on the seas”. Another example is "the air we breathe, the water we drink and the places we treasure”. Would you say that these are examples of both anaphora and tricolon, or just one of these?



I would appreciate your help regarding this but, as mentioned in the start of thsi post, feel free to delete it if you think this forum is not the right place for a question like this one.



Torgeir

Original Post

Hello, EngTeach, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

@EngTeach posted:

This forum may not be the right place to ask this question since it is not a grammar question but rather a question about literary devices. Feel free to remove/delete my question if you feel that it is not suitable for this forum.

Torgeir, we only delete questions that are offensive, or that disrupt the natural course of our forum exchanges (e.g. unsolicited advertising).

I had never heard about tricolon, but it seems to me that it will tend to include the anaphoric device of repeating the same word at the beginning of each phrase or clause:

@EngTeach posted:

The following can be found in one of the texts my students have worked with: “we defend the man in the street, the farmer in the fields and the fisherman on the seas”. Another example is "the air we breathe, the water we drink and the places we treasure”. Would you say that these are examples of both anaphora and tricolon, or just one of these?

In grammar, we generally speak about "parallelism," which is what I notice above — according to the definition I found, this seems to be typical of tricolon. For anaphora to exist, I think a semantically richer word (other than an article, a pronoun or a preposition) should be present. Although I did a lot of literary analysis when I was in college, I'm not an expert at this, but my impression is that there is a great deal of overlapping between both concepts.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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