Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Hi, Tony C,

I agree with David that, in the context of a sentence and particularly in the singular, the phrases he proposes will sound better.

It is also true that in the plural we can find phrases like loan requirements (which will generally refer to the conditions to be met to obtain a loan) or loan needs. These phrases, where "loan" is a noun being used attributively, are more usual as titles or items.

"Noun A + noun B" phrases can usually be broken down into phrases of the type "noun B + preposition + noun A." Depending on the preposition and the nouns involved, different semantic relationships can be established:

- Chair leg (= leg of a chair) (actual possession: the chair has a leg and the leg forms part of the chair)

- Exam date (= date of the exam) (referential possession: the exam has a date but the date does not form part of the exam)

- Tennis game (= game of tennis) (tennis: specific, defining noun + game: general noun)

- London citizens (= citizens of London) (origin)

- Ship captain (= captain of the ship) (ship: the thing owned + captain: the owner)

- Ship size (= size of the ship) (size is a quality of ship)

- Ship sailing (= sailing of a ship) (ship is the object of sailing)

- Bird flight (= flight of a bird) (bird is the subject of flight)

Note: I have taken most of the examples and semantic descriptions above from English Prepositions Explained, Revised edition, by Seth Lindstromberg.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

Dear Gustavo,

Sincerely appreciate for your help. I find that interesting but have few questions:

1. what is actually semantic relations?

2. Chair leg= leg of the chair to describe actual possession. If so, can I say chair’s leg.

3. Am i correct to say, we can use two noun to form a phrase, which is used to refer to the below.

A. Possession

b. Referential possession

c. General noun

d. Origin , e.g. Indonesia Citizen

e. Quality: e.g ship colour, ship length

f. What do u mean by bird flight? The bird flies? Thanks!

@Tony C posted:

1. what is actually semantic relations?

Semantics has to do with meaning, so semantic relations describe how two or more words are related to each other from the point of view of meaning. For example, in currency basket the noun "currency" expresses what the "basket" contains (a mix of currencies), while in leather basket the noun "leather" expresses the material the basket is made of.

@Tony C posted:

2. Chair leg= leg of the chair to describe actual possession. If so, can I say chair’s leg.

No, we don't use the possessive case with inanimate objects. See this.

@Tony C posted:

3. Am i correct to say, we can use two noun to form a phrase, which is used to refer to the below.

A. Possession

b. Referential possession

c. General noun

d. Origin , e.g. Indonesia Citizen

e. Quality: e.g ship colour, ship length

f. What do u mean by bird flight? The bird flies? Thanks!

Yes, you can put certain nouns together to form noun phrases where the first noun is an attribute and the second one, the head (the main noun in the phrase).

c. I don't know what you mean by "general noun."

d. Whenever there is an adjective, it's better to use it:

- an Indonesian citizen / a citizen of Indonesia
- a Spanish citizen / a citizen of Spain

When the name of the country is an abbreviation, we can use it in attributive position:

- a U.S. citizen / an American citizen
- a U.K. citizen / a British citizen

e. Yes, those phrases are correct.

f. "bird flight" means "the flight of a bird" or "the flight of birds." "flight" means "the action of flying."

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

d. Whenever there is an adjective, it's better to use it:

- an Indonesian citizen / a citizen of Indonesia
- a Spanish citizen / a citizen of Spain

When the name of the country is an abbreviation, we can use it in attributive position:

- a U.S. citizen / an American citizen
- a U.K. citizen / a British citizen

"American" is an adjective, "America" is not.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×