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I've come across this sentence here: "I’m quite far in my medical school time so I don’t have lots of free time but I can still have some quality time with my family and friends", but I'm not sure I understand this first part: "I’m quite far in my medical school time".

Does it mean that he has just started medical school, and it's gonna still take him a long time to graduate?

I'll appreciate if you can help me to clarify this sentence.

Thank you so much!

All the best.

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@JessyA posted:

. . . "I’m quite far in my medical school time so I don’t have lots of free time . . .." I'm not sure I understand this first part: "I’m quite far in my medical school time".



Hello, JessyA—I assume that the speaker was trying to say that he or she is quite far along into his or her medical-school program and has thus become so busy that he or she does not have much free time.

@JessyA posted:

Hi, sorry, but it's still not clear to me what this expression "to be quite far along" in this context mean. My question was meant to be about this expression, since I don't understand it here.

"far along" wouldn't be related to physical distance?

No, "far along" is not related to physical distance. Let's suppose the medical program is 4 years in duration. To be 3 years in would be to be far along.

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