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could anybody tell me if this sentence is correct in terms of meaning & structure,

He had his layers buy for million acres.

- In terms of structure, I suppose we should say bought instead of buy.
- In terms of meaning, the sentence does not seem to be completely understood because of the word layers. Is such sentence common to you? could you explain the meaning?

By the way, this sentence has been given to me by one of my students and he read it somewhere.
Original Post
quote:
He had his layers buy for million acres.

No the sentence doesn’t make sense as it is. It is a challenge to me and so I set about to translate it. I may have figured it out, but I don’t say that this is necessarily correct.

First, ‘layers’ may be a metaphor for chickens or geese. They lay eggs. There is a proverb about ‘the goose that laid the golden egg.’ So ‘layers’ might refer to people who work for him and make money for him, especially if he has a chicken farm or some kind of poultry business.

Now, he could have directed these smart employees to do something. What was it? They are to buy four million acres for him. By doing this, he will be in a position to make more money for himself.

So, the sentence could be translated:

• He had his people/ employees/ smart colleagues purchase four million acres for him to use / benefit from.
The original sentence cited is so bizarre that I'd love to know the context!

Anyway, Humam, there are two ways to form a sentence with a causative.

1. If the direct object performs the action, you use the basic verb form no matter what tense the causative verb is in. Here are some examples:

  • She had the plumber install a new sink in her bathroom.
  • We're making our daughter clean her room every day.
  • The boss is going to have his employees take a one-day furlough every month to save the company money.

    2. If the direct object receives the action, the past participle is used (representing the passive voice). Here are some examples:

  • She had a new sink installed in her bathroom.
  • We're having our house painted.
  • The foreman is going to get some employees fired if they don't do a better job.
  • quote:
    He had his layers buy for million acres.


    A layer is a chicken -- one that is the right age to lay eggs. How, Richard, do you go from that to employees?

    The original sentence equally baffled me, but when I read that a student had seen it "somewhere" I thought perhaps he had misremembered it (or just misspelled it) and so the original was perhaps He had his lawyers buy four million acres.

    Humam, is that a possibility?
    It's Rachel. not Richard, who came to this extraordinary conclusion.

    A Google search yielded a few examples of 'layers' as chickens. From that I extrapolated, as mentioned, geese that lay golden eggs. And, excellent executives in a company.

    I grant you that this is far-fetched! It's like a game of Dictionary.

    Okaasan, I think you may have it. The original sentence could be lawyers instead of 'layers.' Now it really does make sense as you have it: He had his lawyers buy four million acres.

    Brava!
    Hi everyone,

    A million thanks to you all for taking all this time trying to explain the meaning of the sentence.

    Actually, I went back to my student and asked him about original text from which brought this sentence.

    Okaasan was right. the original sentence was He had his lawyers buy four million acres. .

    This makes better now. It was really a Riddle.

    Humam
    Hi everyone,

    A million thanks to you all for taking all this time trying to explain the meaning of the sentence.

    Actually, I went back to my student and asked him about the original text from which he brought this sentence.

    Okaasan was right. the original sentence was He had his lawyers buy four million acres..

    This makes it better now. It was really a Riddle.

    Humam

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