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I understand when we refer to something that occurred in the past, we use past tense. However, if it is a matter of fact/actual fact we use present tense.

Could you please kindly explain the use of the following two sentences? Please note it is a matter of fact that the contract date and the settlement date are 1 January 2020 and 1 March 2020 respectively.

(a) You provided a settlement worksheet showing the property is contracted/exchanged on 1 January 2020 and settled on 1 March 2020.

(b) You provided a settlement worksheet showing the property was contracted/exchanged on 1 January 2020 and settled on 1 March 2020.

thanks!!!

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Thanks so much David for the clarification, I thought past facts we also as general facts and therefore present tense applies, my bad .

Just to ensure I understand the application correctly, please kindly confirm the below is correct, that is to use the past form.

The date of unit redemption appeared in your bank statement was 1 January 2020 which differed from the date shown in the David Trust unit register being 15 January 2020. Thanks!

There's some nuance in your original two sentences, beyond a present/past setting. It's also a little different, or difficult, because it sounds like it's legal language, which is quite specific and unique in how it's used. You need to have an understanding of that language in order to correctly interpret it. I don't!

I'm wondering about the smaller words in each of the sentences you've shared - these are what change the meaning, to me. The first sentence has 'on' - it would make more sense to me if it used 'for' or 'from'. So I wonder what the specific use and meaning of that word in this sentence is. I'd agree with David that it's not about fact, but that these two variations differ in meaning in some other way.

Your last paragraph - The date of unit redemption appeared in your bank statement was 1 January 2020 which differed from the date shown in the David Trust unit register being 15 January 2020. Thanks! - also makes me wonder about the preposition used: 'of' doesn't seem to fit here. Is it correctly copied, or is the 'of' perhaps meant to be 'the', or something similar? If it's correct, then that means 'was' is out of place. I would normally think 'of', 'for', or 'on' should go there. There should also be some commas, which would make it clearer (before 'being' and 'which'). Perhaps the writer made a mistake with one of those words (the commas aren't a big deal, but do help - and if they've been omitted, then it makes me think there could also be mistakes with words). Context would help here.

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