Greetings.

Question 1:

It was ____ we had hoped.

A.more a success than

B.a success more than

C.as much of a success as

D.a success as much as

Key: C

I kind of doubt it. I feel that A is also correct.

What do you think?

 

Question 2:

I made some sentences, which relate to the formulation "more A than B":

1, John is very much (of) a musician.

2, John is not very much (of) a musician.

3, John is too much (of) a musician.

4, John is not too much (of) a musician.

5, John is not as much (of) a musician as a singer.

6, John is more (of) a musician than a singer.

 In my opinion, "of ", in this case, is optional. I'm hoping you can point out my mistake, if there is any.

 

Many thanks in advance.

Original Post
Robby zhu posted:

Question 1:

It was ____ we had hoped.

A.more a success than

B.a success more than

C.as much of a success as

D.a success as much as

Key: C

I kind of doubt it. I feel that A is also correct.

What do you think?

Only (C) is correct. "of" is necessary there because the meaning is adjectival. While you can say:

- It was a success.

you cannot say:

- It was more a success than we had hoped.

but:

- It was more successful than we had hoped.

The structure "more of a success" is equivalent to "more successful."

(C) is correct because "as much of a success" is equivalent to "as successful."

Robby zhu posted:

Question 2:

I made some sentences, which relate to the formulation "more A than B":

1, John is very much (of) a musician.

2, John is not very much (of) a musician.

3, John is too much (of) a musician.

4, John is not too much (of) a musician.

5, John is not as much (of) a musician as a singer.

6, John is more (of) a musician than a singer.

In my opinion, "of ", in this case, is optional. I'm hoping you can point out my mistake, if there is any.

I think only (5) and (6) can work without "of," which is required in all of the other cases for (at least approximately) the same reason mentioned above.

(1) to (4) are then fine with "of" (I only wonder how somebody can be "too much of a musician," as if being a musician could be something negative).

For some reason I cannot explain right now (perhaps I can come up with something later), I think (5) and (6) can do without "of":

5. John is not as much (of) a musician as a singer. (John is a singer rather than a musician.)

6. John is more (of) a musician than a singer. (John is a musician rather than a singer.)

Note: You shouldn't write commas but dots or hyphens after numeral bullet points.

For some reason I cannot explain right now (perhaps I can come up with something later), I think (5) and (6) can do without "of"

I've been thinking that those comparatives, "(not) as much (of)" and "more (of)," allow the omission of "of" because they can be understood as reformulatory, that is, as paralinguistic: the speaker/writer might not be comparing the musical/singing talents of the person but redefining his own words:

5'. More than a musician, (I'd say) John is a singer.

6'. More than a singer, (I'd say) John is a musician.

When this reformulatory meaning wants to be conveyed, "of" can be omitted. When the intended meaning is purely linguistic (John's musical/singing talents), then "of" can be used.

Thanks. I will use dots after numbers.

I wrote those sentences imitating some examples like:

7. I'm very much a loner — I never go out. 
8. I'm very much a family man and need to be close to those I love. 
9. He is not so much a journalist as a writer. 
10. The book seems to be more a dictionary than one on grammar. 

I kind of had strong faith in them, but was disappointed to know that they didn't work.

So are these examples flawed? 

Robby zhu posted:

I wrote those sentences imitating some examples like:

7. I'm very much a loner — I never go out. 
8. I'm very much a family man and need to be close to those I love. 
9. He is not so much a journalist as a writer. 
10. The book seems to be more a dictionary than one on grammar. 

I kind of had strong faith in them, but was disappointed to know that they didn't work.

So are these examples flawed? 

No, I'm afraid you misinterpreted me.

I said that with comparisons, as is the case with (9) and (10), you can either use or omit "of". Notice I said: I think (5) and (6) can do without "of."

I think (7) and (8) can work in informal English, but "of" sounds better in standard English. You can check any dictionary to confirm that. Google "very much of a" + dictionary and you'll see.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×