Must


1- I really ..... visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often. (  needn't - have to - need to )
2 - listen to me ! You ...... get a new pump for the fish tank soon. This one doesn't work well. ( must - needn't - need to )
3- the doctor says I ..... lose 10 kilos. ( must - needn't - have to - need to )

Original Post

Hi, Egyptian 2017 (Time passes quickly ),

egyptian2017 posted:


1- I really ..... visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often. (  needn't - have to - need to )

I would go with: 'need to'. It means it is important for me to visit .....

BTW, 'needn't' could work here if there were further context.

egyptian2017 posted:


2 - listen to me ! You ...... get a new pump for the fish tank soon. This one doesn't work well. ( must - needn't - need to )

Using 'soon' refers to the fact that the matter is very urgent and that the speaker gives some strong advice, so I would choose: 'must'.

'Need to' is softer than 'have to'.

egyptian2017 posted:


3- the doctor says I ..... lose 10 kilos. ( must - needn't - have to - need to )

The doctor's actual words are: "You must/should lose ...". So, I would go with 'must' here.

Hello, Egyptian2017 and Ahmed,

I support your recommendations, Ahmed. "Need to" works in (1) ("I really need to visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often"), and "must" works in (2) and (3): "You must get a new pump for the fish tank soon"; "The doctor says I must lose 10 pounds."

It's unfortunate that the most natural and common native-speaking choice for all three sentences -- "should" -- is not even an option provided by the test makers! "Must" also works in (1) -- "I really must visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often" -- but, again, the test makers haven't provided it as an option.

If you'd like more options for each sentence, Egyptian2017, please let us know. I would more naturally use "need to" (or "should") in sentence (2), but that doesn't mean that "must" is incorrect. Again, I support all of Ahmed's recommendations. But those aren't the only correct answers.

David, Moderator posted:

Hello, Egyptian2017 and Ahmed,

I support your recommendations, Ahmed. "Need to" works in (1) ("I really need to visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often"), and "must" works in (2) and (3): "You must get a new pump for the fish tank soon"; "The doctor says I must lose 10 pounds."

It's unfortunate that the most natural and common native-speaking choice for all three sentences -- "should" -- is not even an option provided by the test makers! "Must" also works in (1) -- "I really must visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often" -- but, again, the test makers haven't provided it as an option.

If you'd like more options for each sentence, Egyptian2017, please let us know. I would more naturally use "need to" (or "should") in sentence (2), but that doesn't mean that "must" is incorrect. Again, I support all of Ahmed's recommendations. But those aren't the only correct answers.

thank

ahmed_btm posted:

Hi, Egyptian 2017 (Time passes quickly ),

egyptian2017 posted:


1- I really ..... visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often. (  needn't - have to - need to )

I would go with: 'need to'. It means it is important for me to visit .....

BTW, 'needn't' could work here if there were further context.

egyptian2017 posted:


2 - listen to me ! You ...... get a new pump for the fish tank soon. This one doesn't work well. ( must - needn't - need to )

Using 'soon' refers to the fact that the matter is very urgent and that the speaker gives some strong advice, so I would choose: 'must'.

'Need to' is softer than 'have to'.

egyptian2017 posted:


3- the doctor says I ..... lose 10 kilos. ( must - needn't - have to - need to )

The doctor's actual words are: "You must/should lose ...". So, I would go with 'must' here.

thanks my dear for your help

I agree with you that in number ( 1 )  "need to " is preferred , but " needn't" is also possible if we have further context

in number ( 2 and 3 ) I think  both ( must and need to ) are correct

 

David, Moderator posted:

Hello, Egyptian2017 and Ahmed,

I support your recommendations, Ahmed. "Need to" works in (1) ("I really need to visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often"), and "must" works in (2) and (3): "You must get a new pump for the fish tank soon"; "The doctor says I must lose 10 pounds."

It's unfortunate that the most natural and common native-speaking choice for all three sentences -- "should" -- is not even an option provided by the test makers! "Must" also works in (1) -- "I really must visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often" -- but, again, the test makers haven't provided it as an option.

If you'd like more options for each sentence, Egyptian2017, please let us know. I would more naturally use "need to" (or "should") in sentence (2), but that doesn't mean that "must" is incorrect. Again, I support all of Ahmed's recommendations. But those aren't the only correct answers.

thank you so much for your help

Egyptian2017,

I join David in supporting Ahmed's recommendations, and I also agree with him that these aren't the only possible answers.

I see that David is working under the assumption that your examples are from a test, which is reasonable seeing as each of your selections offers a choice of only three or four multiple-choice answers to choose from.  You do not actually say that this is the case in your post, though, and Ahmed's comments don't necessarily indicate that he is making the same assumption as David.  For what it's worth, I want to make sure that you are aware of the Grammar Exchange's policy regarding quoted material:

https://thegrammarexchange.inf.../topic/use-of-quotes

So, if these examples are from a textbook or workbook, tell us the name of the book and the author, and if the text is available online, provide a link.  If it's from a test, tell us that, and if you can, scan the thing and post the image so we know you are quoting it accurately.  (Keep in mind that if you are paraphrasing the material, you are still required to provide the source.)  If you came up with the examples yourself, it helps us if you let us know that so that we don't have to guess whether you simply neglected to cite your source.

So, back to your examples and Ahmed's and David's comments, I see a considerable overlap in meaning between the expressions "must", "have to", and "need to".  These are my opinions of how these expressions tend to be used, and are not meant to be rigid prescriptions.

I see these expressions as forming as sort of hierarchy:

a: You should get that rash looked at by a doctor.

This is a friendly suggestion.

b: You really should get that rash looked at by a doctor.

This is still a friendly suggestion, but indicates a bit more concern.

c: You need to get that rash looked at by a doctor.

This is a suggestion expressed with great concern and urgency.

d: You have to get that rash looked at by a doctor.

This can actually be interpreted as a command.  Your employer might say this as a condition of your returning to work, out of concern for the safety of your fellow workers.

I see "must" as being much more versatile.  It can be used as a command, a strong recommendation, an enthusiastic invitation, or a statement of likelihood based on the evidence at hand.  Here are examples of each of these, in the order given:

Ma: You must turn this car around immediately and go back the way you came.  You have exactly fifteen seconds.
Mb: You must get those brakes adjusted.  I'm worried about your safety.
Mc: You must come visit soon.  The children have been asking about you.
Md: You must drink at least a liter of gin every night.

All eight of my examples use "you" as the subject, and I'm going to leave it at that for now, but switching to a first or third person subject opens up a whole new set of options and interpretations.

 DocV

Doc V posted:

Egyptian2017,

I join David in supporting Ahmed's recommendations, and I also agree with him that these aren't the only possible answers.

I see that David is working under the assumption that your examples are from a test, which is reasonable seeing as each of your selections offers a choice of only three or four multiple-choice answers to choose from.  You do not actually say that this is the case in your post, though, and Ahmed's comments don't necessarily indicate that he is making the same assumption as David.  For what it's worth, I want to make sure that you are aware of the Grammar Exchange's policy regarding quoted material:

https://thegrammarexchange.inf.../topic/use-of-quotes

So, if these examples are from a textbook or workbook, tell us the name of the book and the author, and if the text is available online, provide a link.  If it's from a test, tell us that, and if you can, scan the thing and post the image so we know you are quoting it accurately.  (Keep in mind that if you are paraphrasing the material, you are still required to provide the source.)  If you came up with the examples yourself, it helps us if you let us know that so that we don't have to guess whether you simply neglected to cite your source.

So, back to your examples and Ahmed's and David's comments, I see a considerable overlap in meaning between the expressions "must", "have to", and "need to".  These are my opinions of how these expressions tend to be used, and are not meant to be rigid prescriptions.

I see these expressions as forming as sort of hierarchy:

a: You should get that rash looked at by a doctor.

This is a friendly suggestion.

b: You really should get that rash looked at by a doctor.

This is still a friendly suggestion, but indicates a bit more concern.

c: You need to get that rash looked at by a doctor.

This is a suggestion expressed with great concern and urgency.

d: You have to get that rash looked at by a doctor.

This can actually be interpreted as a command.  Your employer might say this as a condition of your returning to work, out of concern for the safety of your fellow workers.

I see "must" as being much more versatile.  It can be used as a command, a strong recommendation, an enthusiastic invitation, or a statement of likelihood based on the evidence at hand.  Here are examples of each of these, in the order given:

Ma: You must turn this car around immediately and go back the way you came.  You have exactly fifteen seconds.
Mb: You must get those brakes adjusted.  I'm worried about your safety.
Mc: You must come visit soon.  The children have been asking about you.
Md: You must drink at least a liter of gin every night.

All eight of my examples use "you" as the subject, and I'm going to leave it at that for now, but switching to a first or third person subject opens up a whole new set of options and interpretations.

 DocV

Thanks for clarification , I would like to state that these questions are  from a test.

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