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Hi, Ahmed,

Hello. Which one is correct. Really I'm confused.

- When people drive somewhere, they (have to - need to - must) wear the seat belt. It's a rule.

Thank you.

There is more than one correct choice here. When we talk about a rule or a law, we usually use 'have to' (British English). That's why 'have to' is the best answer here. Please, notice that, in the original question, my friend didn't insert 'need to' in the choices, but you did. 'Need to' is also a correct answer here. If you mention what the law states formally, which isn't the case in your question, use 'must'.

 

Last edited by ahmed_btm

- When people drive somewhere, they (have to - need to - must) wear the seat belt. It's a rule.

I agree with Ahmed_btm that all three choices are correct. For what it's worth, it is a bit more common and natural, at least in American English, to speak of fastening or buckling a seat belt in contexts where one is beginning to wear it.

When people drive somewhere, they should/have to/need to/must:

  • buckle their seat belt
  • buckle their seat belts
  • fasten their seat belt
  • fasten their seat belts

More colloquially, we can say:

  • When you drive somewhere, you've got to buckle up.

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