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Are "namely" and "that are" can be used interchangeably in the below sentence and it is grammatically correct.?

There are two categories of not for profit organisations, namely or that are charities and other NFP that are not charities e.g. sporting and recreational clubs, community service organisations, cultural and social societies, and professional and business associations.

Appreciate if you could shed some lights on this.

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Hi, Tony C,

@Tony C posted:

Are "namely" and "that are" can be used interchangeably in the below sentence and it is grammatically correct.?

There are two categories of not for profit organisations, namely or that are charities and other NFP that are not charities e.g. sporting and recreational clubs, community service organisations, cultural and social societies, and professional and business associations.

Appreciate if you could shed some lights on this.

'That are' is totally ungrammatical. If you want to know how 'namely' works, see David's reply here:

https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/topic/namely

@Tony C posted:

Are "namely" and "that are" can be used interchangeably in the below sentence and it is grammatically correct.?



Hi, Tony—Have you learned how to formulate questions in English? You should have said: "Can 'namely' and 'that are' be used interchangeably . . . ?"

@Tony C posted:

Appreciate if you could shed some lights on this.

You should have said: "I'd appreciate it if you could shed some light on this."

@Tony C posted:

There are two categories of not for profit organisations, namely or that are charities and other NFP that are not charities e.g. sporting and recreational clubs, community service organisations, cultural and social societies, and professional and business associations.

Neither choice works well there, and the sentence needs help. You could say:

  • There are two categories of not-for-profit organizations: charities and such non-charities as sporting and recreational clubs, community-service organizations, cultural and social clubs, and professional and business associations.

Ahmed and David, thanks so much!!! I can't believe it the formulation of that simple question, I could not get it right. I must have been half sleep at the time of posting this question.

For the sentence below.

I'd appreciate it if you could shed some light on this.

Question:

a. Is it necessary to have the object "it" there?

b. Why does the word "light" need to be in a singular form in the above sentence?

@Tony C posted:

For the sentence below.

I'd appreciate it if you could shed some light on this.

Question:

a. Is it necessary to have the object "it" there?

b. Why does the word "light" need to be in a singular form in the above sentence?

a. Yes, it is necessary. The sentence means: "If you could shed some light on this, I would appreciate it." "Appreciate" is a strongly transitive verb (in this meaning) requiring a direct object. You can't say, "I'd appreciate."

b. In the idiomatic expression "shed light on something," "light" is noncount.

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