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Hi, Ahmed,

@Ahmed.A.A posted:

Hi, "There is no bread at home, so I ....... buy some."

a- have to     b- need to   

Is "need to" close in meaning and use to "must" or to "have to" ?

I need to do 'sth' means 'it is necessary / important for me to do it or I should do it (in order to achieve a certain purpose)'. The emphasis is on the fact that it is important for me to do this action.  I have to do 'sth' means 'I am forced to do it (as I have no other choice). The emphasis is on the fact that I'm obliged to do so. Sometimes both can be used interchangeably. 'Must and have to' don't mean that it is just important for me to do 'sth', but that there is a requirement, an obligation, or a major necessity to do. So, in your example, I see that 'need to' works better than 'have to', unless you are going to starve.

@Ahmed.A.A posted:

Hi, "There is no bread at home, so I ....... buy some."

a- have to     b- need to   

Is "need to" close in meaning and use to "must" or to "have to" ?

These are essentially interchangeable:

- There is no bread at home, so I need to buy some.

- There is no bread at home, so I have to buy some.

- There is no bread at home, so I should buy some.

In other situations, there will be slight distinctions between these phrases, but for simple things like this there really is no difference. They all sound natural and fit the situation well. On the other hand, we usually only use "must" for obligations when the meaning is quite strong; it implies a tone of command or absolute necessity. It seems a little too strong for buying groceries. We more commonly use "must" in a slightly different meaning, to make simple inferences, like this:

- Your jacket is soaked through from the rain. You must be very cold.

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