Skip to main content

Hello, Everyone! Could you help me with a couple of sentences:

Not having used the software before, she had to ask for help. The textbook didn't provide such an option but is it possible: Having not used the software before, she had to ask for help.

Having not attended any of the lectures, the student failed the end-of-term exams. That's what the textbook says. But can we say: Not having attended any of the lectures, the student failed the end-of-term exams.

What does the position of not depend on? Emphasis?

Thank you in advance.

Original Post

Hi, Annetik,

@Annetik posted:

Hello, Everyone! Could you help me with a couple of sentences:

Not having used the software before, she had to ask for help. The textbook didn't provide such an option but is it possible: Having not used the software before, she had to ask for help.

Having not attended any of the lectures, the student failed the end-of-term exams. That's what the textbook says. But can we say: Not having attended any of the lectures, the student failed the end-of-term exams.

What does the position of not depend on? Emphasis?

Thank you in advance.

Both are correct. David indicates that both are possible. See here:

https://thegrammarexchange.inf...aving-not-not-having

Personally, I prefer 'not having' because it sounds more natural and that's the way we use in our exams. The emphasis here is on 'not'.

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×