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Hello David,

I saw this phrase - well, I think it is a phrase - on an advertising billboard and I found it interesting: The insight you need to succeed.

When I parse the sentence, it draws 2 NP's at the beginning:

  • The insight;
  • you.

The main verb is: need.

Initially I thought the sentence would equate to: The Insight [that] you need to succeed, but I am having doubts.

Am I correct or is something else happening with those two NP's?

Incidentally, in another parser, [you] is labelled as the subject and [insight] is labelled as a (TMP) temporal phrase which I have not studied.

Many thanks,

Philip

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@Philip posted:

Hello David,

Hello, Philip—You are welcome to say hello to me or to other individual members if you are replying to something they have said. However, an opening post of a thread should not be addressed to me or to any other member or subset of members. The question, in effect, is put to the forum as a whole.

@Philip posted:

I saw this phrase - well, I think it is a phrase - on an advertising billboard and I found it interesting: The insight you need to succeed.

When I parse the sentence, it draws 2 NP's at the beginning:

  • The insight;
  • you.

The main verb is: need.

Initially I thought the sentence would equate to: The Insight [that] you need to succeed, but I am having doubts.

Am I correct or is something else happening with those two NP's?

That's right, for the most part. What you seem not to understand is that "the insight you need to succeed" is not a sentence. It is a noun phrase. The noun phrase is headed by the noun "insight."

The "you need to succeed" part is a relative clause from which the relative pronoun (in this case, "that" or "which") has been omitted. Relative pronouns can be omitted when they function as objects within restrictive relative clauses.

"The insight you need to succeed" can be rephrased "the insight that you need to succeed" or "the insight which you need to succeed." The relative pronoun, co-referent with "insight," functions the direct object of "succeed."

@Philip posted:

Incidentally, in another parser, [you] is labelled as the subject and [insight] is labelled as a (TMP) temporal phrase which I have not studied.

"You" is indeed the subject of the relative clause "[which] you need to succeed," just as "you" is the subject of the sentence "You need this insight to succeed." I have no idea what you mean by calling "insight" a "temporal phrase."

Hi, David,

I have re-read this discussion and have another follow-on question if that is ok?

The original noun phrase was: 'The insight you need to succeed' and after your help, I now understand it can be written as: The insight [that] you need to succeed.

If I analyse the relative clause - you need [that] to succeed - where [that] stands for 'insight', what is the function of 'to succeed'?

Is it post modification or a complement of insight or have I misunderstood entirely?

Many thanks,

Philip

@Philip posted:

The original noun phrase was: 'The insight you need to succeed' and after your help, I now understand it can be written as: The insight [that] you need to succeed.

If I analyse the relative clause - you need [that] to succeed - where [that] stands for 'insight', what is the function of 'to succeed'?



Hi, Philip—In the sentence "You need that to succeed" (or "You need insight to succeed"), "to succeed" functions as an adjunct of purpose, answering the quesiton "Why?" Consider that "to" can be expanded to "in order to":

  • You need that in order to succeed.
  • You need insight in order to succeed.

Original noun phrase: The insight you need to succeed

Hi, David,

Thank you for replying.  If I understand correctly, "to succeed" is therefore an adverbial adjunct of purpose modifying "need" at the predicate level and not the sentence level?

I am referring to the following book for my understanding of adjunct terminology:

  • Crystal, David. 1988. Rediscover grammar with David Crystal. Harlow: Longman, pg 156.


Many thanks,

Philip

@Philip posted:

Original noun phrase: The insight you need to succeed

Hi, David,

Thank you for replying.  If I understand correctly, "to succeed" is therefore an adverbial adjunct of purpose modifying "need" at the predicate level and not the sentence level?

I am referring to the following book for my understanding of adjunct terminology:

  • Crystal, David. 1988. Rediscover grammar with David Crystal. Harlow: Longman, pg 156.

The idea is that you need to have that in order to succeed. Your success depends on your having that. It does not depend on your needing that!

Last edited by David, Moderator

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