1. This problem is more difficult than that one. Actually, this is the most difficult problem of the book.
2. Sharks are more dangerous than whales. They are the most dangerous animals of the sea.

I am not happy with "of the book, of the sea". Shouldn't they be: in the book, in the sea?

 

(Source: Iran's English Coursebooks, grade 12)

Original Post
Freeguy posted:

I am not happy with "of the book, of the sea".

Hello, Freeguy -- I am not happy with them, either.

Freeguy posted:
Shouldn't they be: in the book, in the sea?

Yes, they should, at least from the standpoint of idiomaticity. "Of the book" is technically OK in (1), but there is the distracting sense that the problem may belong to the book.

You could, however, use the possessive and speak of "the book's most difficult problem." That would naturally be interpreted as referring to the most difficult problem in the book.

As for (2), you could use "of" and "in": "the most dangerous animal of all the animals in the sea." Incidentally, to avoid objections based on biological technicalities, you might change "animal(s)" to "creature(s)" or "life form(s)."

Yes, it works because, just as you say that New York has buildings, you can also say that XXX is the tallest building of New York.

Thanks for the time.

As you saw, David says the following is unnatural:

 

Sharks are more dangerous than whales. They are the most dangerous animals of the sea.

 

Based on your interpretation, can't we say that the sea has animals, and xx is the most dangerous of the sea?

Freeguy posted:

As you saw, David says the following is unnatural:

Sharks are more dangerous than whales. They are the most dangerous animals of the sea.

Based on your interpretation, can't we say that the sea has animals, and xx is the most dangerous of the sea?

No, because you cannot say "the sea's most dangerous animals."

Instead, you can say "New York's tallest building."

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