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Hi, Tony and Ahmed,

I agree that "on" is the correct preposition that the verb "impose" takes. However, I'd use the more personal "whom" to refer to "customers":

- The details of the customers on whom the late payment fee was imposed are as follows:

or the less formal and more common:

- The details of the customers the late payment fee was imposed on are as follows:

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

Of  which; within which; in which

In the examples below, please kindly point out the particular verb that determines the preposition to take

A) There is one policy missing from Table 2.0, details of which were provided to the insurance broker at the time where all insurance information was provided.

B) The Commissioner has an unlimited period within which to review and assess the trustee's tax position.

C) This document explains our practice of limiting the time in which we will raise an original income tax assessment for a trustee. Many thanks!

Thanks so much, it's very clear, I am curious he use of the prepositions before which. But just wanted to clarify couple of things below and your response is greatly appreciated.

1) in the C example above, can we use within instead? so This document explains our practice of limiting the time within which we will raise an original income tax assessment for a trustee.



2) What about for which, have I applied correctly in the sentence below.

I bought an expensive bag for which it is used for attending a VIP meeting?

3) Can you give a good example the use of by which? this seems to be common as well.

@Tony C posted:

1) in the C example above, can we use within instead? so This document explains our practice of limiting the time within which we will raise an original income tax assessment for a trustee.

With periods of time, "in" and "within" are usually interchangeable to mean that the period in question should not be exceeded.

@Tony C posted:

2) What about for which, have I applied correctly in the sentence below.

I bought an expensive bag for which it is used for attending a VIP meeting?

No, the sentence above does not work. Perhaps you wanted to say:

- I bought an expensive bag for attending a VIP meeting.

This is an example where "for which" can be used:

- I bought an expensive bag for which I paid a fortune (I paid a fortune for the bag).

@Tony C posted:

3) Can you give a good example the use of by which? this seems to be common as well.

- Please tell me the deadline by which I have to submit the documents.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator
@Tony C posted:

how to make it easy for me to remember  whether it is the noun or the verb that determines the choice of the preposition.

The only way I can think of is to form a sentence without the relative clause and see which preposition is required. The same preposition that is used in a simple sentence will be required for the relative clause:

- A late payment fee was imposed on the customers.
- These are the customers on whom a late payment fee was imposed.

- The details of the missing policy were provided to the insurance broker.
- There is one policy missing, the details of which were provided to the insurance broker.

- The Commissioner has to review and assess the trustee's tax position within a certain period.
- The Commissioner has a certain period within which to review and assess the trustee's tax position.

- I paid a fortune for a bag.
- I bought an expensive bag for which I paid a fortune.

- I have to submit the documents by a set deadline.
- Please tell me the deadline by which I have to submit the documents.

Applying what you taught me above, please kindly advise whether I have applied the correct preposition for the sentences below.

1. I thought I'd just email you regarding my queries in respect of the XYZ Trust for which you were the auditor who audited this trust. [In this case the XYZ trust is the noun that determines the choice of the preposition]

2. Did we receive the details of rental expenses for all properties you owned on which you claimed as tax deductions. [in this context the verb claimed determines the preposition]

3. I have included my reasoning to increase the interest rate on the $1M loan on which I consider as a high risk loan [The $1M determines the preposition, so on the $1M loan]

4. You took $1m to purchase units in a unit trust on/for which the proceeds were used to acquire the 21 York Street property. [the $1 m loan determines the preposition, so on that $1, used to acquire the 21 York St property.

Appreciate if you could shed some light

@Tony C posted:

1. I thought I'd just email you regarding my queries in respect of the XYZ Trust for which you were the auditor who audited this trust.

The relative clause (trust) for which you were the auditor who audited this trust is definitely redundant. You should say:

1a. I thought I'd just email you regarding my queries in respect of the XYZ Trust for which you were the auditor.

or

1b. I thought I'd just email you regarding my queries in respect of the XYZ Trust (that/which) you audited.

Actually, although (1a) sounds fine to me, the main clause that the relative derives from could also be: You were the auditor of the XYZ Trust, in which case (1c) would also work:

1c. I thought I'd just email you regarding my queries in respect of the XYZ Trust of which you were the auditor.

@Tony C posted:

2. Did we receive the details of rental expenses for all properties you owned on which you claimed as tax deductions.

I think you mean to say that you claimed those rental expenses as tax deductions. In that case, you should say:

2a. Did we receive the details of rental expenses for all the properties you owned which you claimed as tax deductions?

@Tony C posted:

3. I have included my reasoning to increase the interest rate on the $1M loan on which I consider as a high risk loan.

Same case as above: you consider the $1M loan as a high-risk loan, so the relative does not need a preposition:

3a. I have included my reasoning to increase the interest rate on the $1M loan which I consider as a high-risk loan.

@Tony C posted:

4. You took $1m to purchase units in a unit trust on/for which the proceeds were used to acquire the 21 York Street property.

No. In this case, I'd use "whose proceeds," or "the proceeds of which":

4a. You took $1m to purchase units in a unit trust whose proceeds were used to acquire the 21 York Street property.

@Tony C posted:

Applying what you taught me above [...]

You don't seem to have fully understood what I explained concerning the need to break the complex sentence down in order to establish the correct syntactic and semantic relationship between the main and the relative clause.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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