This question has been sent in by Apple, who can not access the Newsgroup at the moment:
_______
Take a look at the following sentences.
(1) My brother wanted to be a teacher and I wanted be one too.
(2) My brothers wanted to be teachers and we wanted to be ones too.

Is (2) correct?
If not, why not? The plural form "ones" always needs a determiner "the". Is this it?
We just tell the students this rule?
Original Post
The plural of the pronoun "one" – "ones" – does not always need a determiner, although it very frequently does occur with "the," as in:

"¢ Bob likes those doughnuts, but the ones that I like have cinnamon sugar.
"¢ The professor asked the students who were not taking the entrance exam to leave. He asked the ones who were taking the entrance exam to stay.

"The ones" in the sentences above refer to specific plural count nouns.

Here are some examples with "ones" without "the." These refer to generalizations of plural count nouns:

"¢ Her memories of her childhood are happy ones.
"¢ Sally always buys brown eggs, but I always buy white ones.
"¢ There were several dresses in her closet – cotton ones and silk ones – but no jeans.

"¢ Their problems were ones that could not be solved easily.
"¢ They looked like good people, ones we could trust.
"¢ There were all kinds of hair styles at the beauty show: long ones and short ones, purple ones and green ones, ones that looked like the girl next door and ones that looked as if they came from Mars.

As in these examples, "ones" needs either a descriptive modifier in front of it or a modifying clause or phrase after it. "Ones""”unlike "one" -- does not occur alone.

You would have to change your sentence. It could be:

"¢ My brothers wanted to be teachers and we wanted to be teachers too.
"¢ My brothers just wanted to be teachers but we wanted to be extraordinary ones.
"¢ My brothers just wanted to be teachers but we wanted to be ones whom everyone admired.

Rachel

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×