only one

1) Only one is a wanderer. Two together are always going somewhere.
2) One alone is a wanderer. Two together are going somewhere.

The first sentence is from the famous classic 'Vertigo' by Hitchcock.

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Source:
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Vertigo

 


I think understand the sentence. But is it grammatical?
How about '2'?

What does 'one' mean in that sentence?
Is that usage natural and idiomatic?


Gratefully,
Navi

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