Hi, Apple,

"Onto" generally indicates motion of one thing onto another. For example, "He jumped onto the hood of the car."

Because the motion of software onto a computer is figuratively involved in downloading software, "onto" would have been a better choice than "on to."

As to "on to," we use it when "on" and "to" function separately. For example, "drove on" & "to San Francisco" are separate in "They drove on to San Francisco."

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