Hi,

I think both options are wrong. Only these would work, in my opinion:

- He is walking to work as he has sold his car.

- He is walking to work as he sold his car last Monday.

- He has been walking to work since last Monday, when he sold his car.

- He sold his car last Monday, and has been walking to work ever since / since then.

I like Gustavo's revisions and agree that the grammar exercise yields a poor isolated sentence with either choice. I say "yields a poor isolated sentence" rather than "yields a poor sentence" because it is possible to conceive of strange contexts in which the sentence would work, and then it would need "has sold."

A: I don't understand why he is walking to work. The last time I saw him was last Monday, and he drove to work that day.

B: He is walking to work as he has sold his car since last Monday. He sold his car last Thursday, actually, and started walking to work on Friday.

ahmed_btm posted:

Hi, Abo Hamza,

Abo Hamza posted:

Could you please answer this question?

He is walking to work as he ....................................... his car since last Monday.

(sold/has sold )

Use: 'has sold'.

I think that "Has sold his car since Monday" is strange, because, as far as I know, in this context, it means "He has been selling his car since Monday), which is strange, because he keeps on selling and selling, even if it's already sold.

Hi, Harry,

As you can see there are only two options in the question above. Unfortunately, such examples are found in some of our outside books. I have just given the expected model answer to this question in our books. I didn't bother myself with any other details.

Grammatically speaking, the verb 'sell' is a 'one time' verb, which means that it can't be used to describe an action that continued for a period of time. That's why Gustavo corrected the sentence like this:

- He is walking to work as he has sold his car.

David describes the grammar exercise as poor and strange. Being a far-sighted native speaker, he says that it is possible to conceive of strange contexts in which the sentence would work. As you can see he imagined a situation in which 'has sold' could work. Grammar rules are not carved in stone, my dear. 

Thank you for your efforts in responding to Harry, Ahmed.

Harry O'Neil posted:

I think that "Has sold his car since Monday" is strange, because, as far as I know, in this context, it means "He has been selling his car since Monday), which is strange, because he keeps on selling and selling, even if it's already sold.

Hi, Harry,

In case you are a native speaker of English, you might try substituting "Monday" with "then" or moving the "since"-phrase to the front of the sentence to see the possibility of the intended reading:

(1a) He has sold his car since Monday.
(1b) He has sold his car since then.

(1c) Since Monday he has sold his car.
(1d) Since then he has sold his car.

Also, consider the possibility of the following dialogue:

A: We last saw each other on Monday. What have you done since then?
B: Well, among other things, I've sold my car.

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