Which are correct:

1-If a pushed car reaches a downward slope, there might be trouble, unless someone is behind the wheel.

2-If a car pushed reaches a downward slope, there might be trouble, unless someone is behind the wheel.

3-If a car being pushed reaches a downward slope, there might be trouble, unless someone is behind the wheel.

4-If a car that is pushed reaches a downward slope, there might be trouble, unless someone is behind the wheel.


5-The pushed car was approaching a downward slope.
6-The car pushed was approaching a downward slope.
7-The car being pushed was approaching a downward slope.



My problem with 'a pushed car' and [B]'the pushed car'[B] is that, although they seem similar to 'a broken bone' and 'the broken bone', they are not. A broken bone has been broken and is not in the process of being broken, but a pushed car (in these examples at least) is a car that is in the process of being pushed. I think 'a car being pushed' or 'the car being pushed' are OK.
Original Post
Your analysis is interesting, Navi, but I don't think it covers this topic enough to warrant only the use of a/the car being pushed.

It all has to do with context and situations, and not just with a grammatical construction. The reason you accept a broken bone is that it's a bone that is broken. There's nothing inherently wrong with saying a pushed car as it means a car that is pushed. The reason I agree that it shouldn't be used in this context is that it can mean the car is pushed just once, so it won't make sense in this context. Saying a/the car being pushed clearly means it's in the process of this happening, which does make sense in this context.

So the long and short of it is that there's nothing wrong with [i]a/the pushed car
, but it doesn't work in this context.

We have an expression in English: There's no use crying over spilled milk. That means milk that is/has been spilled. (The meaning is that if something has been done, you can't undo it, or "What's done is done.") Anyway, in this context, spilled milk works.

We need to keep in mind that a grammatical construction may work in one situation but not in another.

As to your specific sentences:

1- This is fine if you mean the car has been pushed one time and then proceeds downhill under its own momentum.

2- I don't think this works with the past participle adjective following the noun it's modifying.

3- This is fine if you mean somebody has stayed behind and with the car and is continuing to push it.

4- Again, this is fine if you mean pushed one time.

5- This works.
6- I don't think this works for the reason I've already stated.
7- This works.

Richard
Thanks a lot Richard,

I am not sure that there is a difference between what we are saying here.
To me, 'spilled milk' means milk that has been split. Could be used for 'milk that is being spilled' (or in other words for 'spilling milk')?

I can see that 'a pushed car' could theoritically at least be used to mean 'a car that has been pushed'. But could it mean 'a car that is being pushed'?

Could:
'a/the car repaired' or 'a/the repaired car' mean 'the car that is being repaired'?
Could:
'a/the defeated man'[B] or [B]'a/the man defeated' mean 'the man that is being defeated?


That is why I don't see how 'the pushed car' could mean 'the car being pushed'. Is this an exceptional case or have I got it all wrong?

I just read your edited version. I think by 'a pushed car' you mean 'a car that has been pushed and is no longer pushed'. I meant a car whose engine had broken down and was being pushed. That's why I put in the idea that someone should sit behind the wheel. I thought that would make it clear that the car wasn't being pushed with the intention of sending it over the top. I always have difficulty constructing contexts!
Yes, my friend, spilled milk can mean milk that has been spilled or milk that is spilled. But no, I don't think it can mean milk that is being spilled. Milk being spilled would take care of that.

As for spilling milk, I only see that as a gerund noun phrase: Spilling milk is something little kids always seem to do.

I don't think a pushed car clearly relates to us that the car is being pushed, but I suppose it's in the realm of possibilities. A car being pushed really keeps this clear.

I don't think a/the car repaired or a/the repaired car can mean a/the car that is being repaired. Both would mean that the task has been accomplished already.

Likewise, a/the defeated man or a/the man defeated cannot mean a/the man is being defeated. It means this has already happened to him.

The pushed car can mean the car being pushed theoretically speaking, but it's not clear that the idea is the act is in progress, so you don't really have it wrong.

What I meant about a pushed car, Navi, is that it more than likely communicates one of two things: (1) The car was pushed once. (2) The car has been pushed -- whether to a gas station or over a cliff! Wink

I hope we're done with pushing cars. hehehehe Smile
Richard

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