Perambulatory

Hello, everyone,

With a view to ensure whether I could use 'perambulatory' in a certain way (which I will come to later on), I ran a search on COCA and came upon the following: 

 "Such guarantees of public input reflect the Parties' perambulatory affirmation of the importance of public participation in conserving, protecting, and enhancing the environment."

https://corpus.byu.edu/coca/

I don't understand the meaning of the word in question in the above sentence. Would someone help me understand it, please?

Thanks.

Original Post
ahmad posted:

With a view to ensure whether I could use 'perambulatory' in a certain way (which I will come to later on), I ran a search on COCA and came upon the following: 

 "Such guarantees of public input reflect the Parties' perambulatory affirmation of the importance of public participation in conserving, protecting, and enhancing the environment."

https://corpus.byu.edu/coca/

I don't understand the meaning of the word in question in the above sentence. Would someone help me understand it, please?

Hello, Ahmad,

I believe that "perambulatory" was a misprint. The intended word, it seems to me, was "preambulatory. The "r" and "e" are in the wrong order.

A "preambulatory affirmation" is an affirmation contained in a preamble (introduction). "Preambulatory" alternates with "preambulary" and "preambular."

Hi, David,

Your explanation is on the dot. Allow me to come to my real question.

If I am directed by some edict or formal order to carry out a short journey, especially on foot, may I refer to such a one as follows.

"The perambulatory orders have been carried out completely."

"The orders of perambulatory import/with perambulatory implications have been carried out completely."

Thanks.

 

 

 

 

ahmad posted:

If I am directed by some edict or formal order to carry out a short journey, especially on foot, may I refer to such a one as follows.

"The perambulatory orders have been carried out completely."

"The orders of perambulatory import/with perambulatory implications have been carried out completely."

Hello again, Ahmad,

Yes, I believe those two sentences are fine and express the meaning you wish them to express. I like "the perambulatory orders" the best.

"Perambulatory orders" is similar to "grammatical errors," which refers to errors of a grammatical nature, not to errors having the virtue of being grammatical.

The reason I have qualified my answer with "I believe" is that I am not at home with "perambulatory." I don't think I have ever once used the word in real life.

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