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With Britain in political crisis and a new deadline to leave the European Union two weeks away, Parliament is debating Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit plan, which it has already rejected twice by large margins, before a third vote on Friday afternoon.  (source of this sentence: with britain in political crisis and a new deadline).

 

1) With Britain in political crisis and a new deadline to leave the European Union two weeks away-is it an absolute phrase? Or is it an appositive? It seems to me that I shouldn't focus on whether it is absolute or appositive, but I need to focus on the way this kind of phrase/clause is constructed. Several times I have seen such constructions which begin with with and give extra information about what have been said in main clauses. However, I have faced difficulty to relate this sort of phrases with their main clauses in order to understand their meanings and pruposes in a perfect way.

2) Moreover, I don't know how many ways we can use to form/construct this sort of phrases. For example, there is a link where with+noun+participle has been discussed whereas the With Britain in political crisis and a new deadline doesn't contain any kind of participle.
So, we can say there are atleast two types of phrases that begin with with, where one type contains participle and another doesn't have any participle. There might have other forms/types which I don't know.

It would be really helpful if the experts of this site would discuss this topic elaborately.

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With Britain in political crisis and a new deadline to leave the European Union two weeks away, Parliament is debating Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit plan, which it has already rejected twice by large margins, before a third vote on Friday afternoon.  (source of this sentence: with britain in political crisis and a new deadline).

1) With Britain in political crisis and a new deadline to leave the European Union two weeks away-is it an absolute phrase?

Nousher, it is an absolute clause.

Absolute clauses can start with the preposition "with," and must always contain a subject followed by a participle (present or past), a to- infitinitive, an adjective, a noun, an adverb, or a prepositional phrase (as in your example).

Nousher, it is an absolute clause.

Absolute clauses can start with the preposition "with," and must always contain a subject followed by a participle (present or past), a to- infitinitive, an adjective, a noun, an adverb, or a prepositional phrase (as in your example).

I have read some blogs which discussed absolute phrase. These blogs mainly focused on the participle forms of absolute phrase. However, I didn't find any blog which discusses absolute phrase that starts with with.

 

With is not mandatory. It is optional. May I ask you to say in details what kind of absolute phrase starts with with?

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