Please, help me with this sentence: "There in draughts the wind is going to moan overhead until morning." Is this sentence correct? (Meaning that the wind passes through draught-gaps between buildings such as narrow lanes, archways and so on, producing moaning or howling sound.) 

Original Post

I think 'in draughts' describes the way the wind blows. Still, have in mind that English is not my native language. You will always be told better what is what by a native speaker.

Windward posted:

Please, help me with this sentence: "There in draughts the wind is going to moan overhead until morning." Is this sentence correct?

Hello, Windward—Where does this sentence come from? Is there text which comes before and/or after the sentence? If so, what is it?

Hello. This is a literal translation of a line in a poem that's why it may sound weird. There is nothing before it, it is the beginning of the verse. It describes gloomy weather, depression, a vagabond goes along a dark narrow street and the wind is going to wail above his head in draughts. But it is literal translation, that's why I want to know whether it  conveys the mood in a grammatically correct way.

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×