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Hi, Jacob,

@Jacob B. posted:

"I created a handout for clients that explains our policy."

The sentence is correct as is, and does not require a comma. Both the prepositional phrase and the relative clause are restrictive in meaning. Notice that the first prepositional phrase could be thought of as stemming from a defining relative clause:

- I created a handout that is intended for clients.
- I created a handout that explains our policy.
- I created a handout that is intended for clients and (that) explains our policy → I created a handout for clients that explains our policy.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

Hi, Jacob,

The sentence is correct as is, and does not require a comma. Both the prepositional phrase and the relative clause are restrictive in meaning. Notice that the first prepositional phrase could be thought of as stemming from a defining relative clause:

- I created a handout that is intended for clients.
- I created a handout that explains our policy.
- I created a handout that is intended for clients and (that) explains our policy → I created a handout for clients that explains our policy.

Would it also be correct to have the prepositional phrase at the end and the relative clause next to the noun?

Example A: "There were things that the child could have put in its mouth strewn on the floor."

Or would it be more logical to reverse it.

Example B: "There were things strewn on the floor that the child could have put in its mouth."

@Jacob B. posted:

Would it also be correct to have the prepositional phrase at the end and the relative clause next to the noun?

Example A: "There were things that the child could have put in its mouth strewn on the floor."

Or would it be more logical to reverse it.

Example B: "There were things strewn on the floor that the child could have put in its mouth."

Actually, "strewn on the floor" is a participial clause, not a prepositional phrase. These clauses work better immediately after the noun, without the interference of a relative clause, as in Example (B), or at the beginning:

C: Strewn on the floor were things that the child could have put in his/her mouth.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator
@Jacob B. posted:

"I created a handout for clients that explains our policy."

Can someone please explain how to punctuate the above sentence?  "For clients" is a prepositional phrase, and "that explains our policy" is a relative clause. Both modify "handout", so where does the comma go.

Very fruitful discussion. I agree with all of Gustavo's replies here. I'd just like to mention that another option is to use a second prepositional phrase after "for clients" instead of the relative clause. Both ways are perfectly fine, though.

  • I created a handout for clients with an explanation of our policy.

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