Dear teachers.
Please tell me if my comments about the two sentences are correct? Thanks.
1. This is a rare opportunity. You should take advantage of it to get a better job.
=> a. This is the rare opportunity which you should take advantage of to get a better job.
=> b. This is the rare opportunity of which you should take advantage to get a better job.
Only sentence (a) is correct.
2. This is the result of our work. I'm pleased with it.
=> a. This is the result of our work which I'm pleased.
=> b. This is the result of our work of which I'm pleased.
Both sentence (a) and (b) are correct.
Original Post
quote:
1. This is a rare opportunity. You should take advantage of it to get a better job.
=> a. This is the rare opportunity which you should take advantage of to get a better job.
=> b. This is the rare opportunity of which you should take advantage to get a better job.
Only sentence (a) is correct.

Sentence a) is correct (although you would probably say 'a rare opportunity' instead of 'the rare opportunity).

Sentence b) is not correct. It's not correct because 'to take advantage of' is a phrasal verb + preposition combination. In this kind of word combination, we don't separate any of the words from the others; thus, we can't take the 'of' away from the other words to put it at the front of the adjective clause.

The second question will be answered tomorrow.
Last edited by Rachel, Moderator
quote:
2. This is the result of our work. I'm pleased with it.

=> a. This is the result of our work which I'm pleased.
=> b. This is the result of our work of which I'm pleased.

Both sentence (a) and (b) are correct.


I'd say:

a. This is the result of our work which I'm pleased with.
or better, but different:
b. It is the result of our work which I'm pleased with/about.

if the pleasing is about the work.

P.S.

You need a comma after "work" in 2a in order to mean you're pleased about the situation/result, also then I'd change it to:

a. This is the result of our work, (a situation/result) which pleases me.

However, without "situation/result" for many the meaning of the latter would be ambiguous, some would see the reference of pleasing being the work, others the situation/result.
Last edited by Marius Hancu
quote:
This is the result of our work. I'm pleased with it.
a. This is the result of our work which I'm pleased.
b. This is the result of our work of which I'm pleased.


These two sentences are not correct, Coco. in a), you need ‘with’ because ‘with’ has been added to complete ‘pleased.’ You can, in this case, say:

• 1) This is the result of our work, with which I’m pleased.

OR

• 2) This is the result of our work, which I’m pleased with

In both sentences, I’ve added commas because the information seems to be extra. When extra information is added – information not necessary to identify the noun – it’s added in a non-essential (non-restrictive) relative clause, here with which I’m pleased / which I’m pleased with. With the commas, the speaker means that he is pleased with the entire result of the work.

In this sentence with a non-essential clause, ‘which, not ‘that,’ must be used. So, the two choices for this sentence are

• This is the result of our work, with which I’m pleased.
• This is the result of our work, which I’m pleased with.
_______

The sentences could also appear without the commas. In this case, the speaker would be referring to the result of the work, but only the result with which he is pleased. There are more results which he is not pleased with, or which haven’t been examined yet. In this case, the sentence can be

• This is the result of our work with which I’m pleased
• This is the result of our work which I’m pleased with.
• This is the result of our work that I’m pleased with.
• This is the result of our work I’m pleased with.

In these sentences, a restrictive clause is added, without commas.

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