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Hi, May123,

@May123 posted:

Does "We are going to Paris on Friday" have the meaning, "We will go to Paris on Friday" or "We will be going to Paris on Friday"?

I don't quite understand what you mean by a tense having the same meaning as another. I suppose you want to know if they are equivalent. Unlike the future simple and the future continuous, the present continuous is typically used to describe future plans and arrangements.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator
@May123 posted:

Does "We are going to Paris on Friday" have the meaning, "We will go to Paris on Friday" or "We will be going to Paris on Friday"?

I don't quite understand what you mean by a tense having the same meaning as another. I suppose you want to know if they are equivalent. Unlike the future simple and the future continuous, the present continuous is typically used to describe future plans and arrangements.

Hi, May123—I agree with Gustavo's response. You seem to want to reduce one tense to another. If the tenses could be so reduced, there would be a great deal of redundancy in the tense system.

Your question would have made more sense if you had asked whether "We are going to Paris on Friday" is closer in meaning to "We will go to Paris on Friday" or to  "We will be going to Paris on Friday."

It is closer to the latter. Indeed, in conversation, the question, "What are you doing on Friday?" could be answered with either "We will be going to Paris" or "We are going to Paris."

"We will go to Paris on Friday" would be used in a different context altogether. Perhaps a family is debating about what to do on Friday. Finally, the family member who wants to go to Paris wins. "OK, we will go to Paris on Friday."

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