present continuous or be going to

Hello, teachers

I found this question in an outside book "not a school book" __ He has filled up the bucket with water. He ........the car. ( a- is washing / b- is going to wash).

My choice is "is going to".

As far as I understand, both the progressive form and be going to are sometimes interchangeable (when they express the future). Yet, the present continuous implies arrangements while  the "be going to" form refers to intentions or decisions in addition to "present reality".

That's why I chose "be going to" depending also on this attachment from "A Practical English Grammar".

*Is my choice right?

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Original Post

Is it Ok to say that "BOTH OPTIONS" work with different meanings?

Yes, but in the context, you are most likely to want (b).  I can only see (a) working if you're giving a play-by-play narration like a sports announcer:

He's picked up the ball.  He's running with it.  He scores a touchdown!

DocV

ayman posted:

He has filled up the bucket with water. He ........the car. ( a- is washing / b- is going to wash).

Hello, Ayman,

I agree with everything Ahmed_btm and DocV have said and would simply like to add that the question is clearly setting up a relationship between the two sentences such that the second sentence explains why he did what he did.

He has filled the bucket up with water?
(Why?)
(Because) He is going to wash the car.

The second sentence can be a simple description of the reason for the action reported in the first sentence. It can, alternatively, be an inference based on the speaker's observation of the action reported in the first sentence. Compare:

  • He has filled up the bucket with water. He must be going to wash the car.

Thanks a million, teachers.

I have another question of you may allow me.

Can we see this clause "the Earth is very crowded" as a present reality or an evidence for "living on the moon" ___ The Earth is very crowded. I think people are going to live on the moon.___ or we should choose "will live" instead?

Ayman,

Can we see this clause "the Earth is very crowded" as a present reality or an evidence for "living on the moon" ___ The Earth is very crowded. I think people are going to live on the moon.___ or we should choose "will live" instead?

I think you're waxing a bit too esoteric for the forum here.  You're talking about what is currently an impossibility.  The closest I can come to making sense of that is:

1: The Earth has become overcrowded.  I think it will be necessary to find a way for people to live on the Moon.

In both your example and mine, the first sentence does indeed express a present reality.  (Please note that by "present reality", I mean a statement of fact, regardless of whether it is actually true.)  As technology stands today, I don't see how either statement can be interpreted as evidence that people will ever live on the moon.  Can you see why I think that my corollary makes more sense?

To bring things closer to home (for me, at least), this works:

2: California has become overcrowded.  We'll be seeing a lot of people moving to Oregon soon.

DocV

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