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Hi

"I was shooting in the 70s and decided to become a golf pro. (This was when the Ladies Professional Golf Association was just about to open their headquarters in Daytona Beach.) I applied for the apprentice position working in the pro shop and got it.

I think (pro) is the short form for (professsional). If so, did he apply for a job as a player to play or to work in the shop? My understanding of working in the pro shop is that he was selling something but not playing.

My question about (70s) may not be relevant here, but what does (70s) mean? I have no idea how golf scores are caculated. I hope you can refer me to website where I can ubderstand what is excatly meant by (70s, 80s, etc)...

Thanks.

Original Post
I think (pro) is the short form for (professsional).

Hi, Izzy—Yes, that's right. "Pro" is short for "professional" (two "s"s).

If so, did he apply for a job as a player to play or to work in the shop?

He applied to work at a shop whose clientele was mainly professional golfers.

My question about (70s) may not be relevant here, but what does (70s) mean?

It means the decade of the 1970s.

I hope you can refer me to website where I can ubderstand what is excatly meant by (70s, 80s, etc)...

Do you need a website reference to understand 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s?

Thanks a lot.

I do not think that what is meant is the decades. Please see the highlighted number (80). I think (70s) refer to score. I have provided a long text just to make sure that what I am refering to is clear.

 

"I was shooting in the 70s and decided to become a golf pro. (This was when the Ladies Professional Golf Association was just about to open their headquarters in Daytona Beach) I applied for the apprentice position working in the pro shop and got it. My wage was now $8 an hour, but I didn’t get tips or have time to look for golf balls, so my income remained the same. I didn’t care though, because I was going to be a pro and make big bucks, or so I thought.

I took the PGA test for my pro card a couple of times but never broke 80. My nerves couldn’t handle it. So I set my sights on being a club pro. I sat down with the club pro at the LPGA course where I worked and asked him how long before  I would start making good money. He busted my bubble when he said, “Keith, I am going to be honest with you. You are going to have to pay your dues. It will take at least five or six years before you can move up.”

I do not think that what is meant is the decades.

Right, Izzy, the expanded context makes it fairly clear that 70s and 80s, etc., refers to the golf-score ranges 70–79, 80–89, etc. It would be helpful if you included a link to the sources you quote or at least cited the name and author of the piece. Using quotation marks is doing the absolute bare minimum. To understand golf-score ranges, you should ask a golfer, not a grammarian.

Last edited by David, Moderator

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