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Hello, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

"Question" is not a good title for any question here. You should be more specific. Please read our Guidelines above.

@Former Member posted:

He ............London for three years.

( has been in - has gone to)

There's been a lot of argument  about the two options  mentioned above. Some say has been in,others say has gone to.My answer is has been in.

Both are correct.

Here you can find David's explanation as to why "has gone to" can correctly be used with "since" or "for"-adverbials. He has gone to London (OR has been going) to London for three years would mean that he has gone there with a certain frequency over a period of three years.

Instead, he has been in London for three years means that he has had a permanent stay there for three years now.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

Hi, Mr. Abd El-Hakam, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange,

@Former Member posted:

He ............London for three years.

( has been in - has gone to)

There's been a lot of argument  about the two options  mentioned above. Some say has been in,others say has gone to.My answer is has been in.

Am I right or wrong?

Thanks in advance

Hello, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

"Question" is not a good title for any question here. You should be more specific. Please read our Guidelines above.

Both are correct.

Here you can find David's explanation as to why "has gone to" can correctly be used with "since" or "for"-adverbials. He has gone to London (OR has been going) to London for three years would mean that he has gone there with a certain frequency over a period of three years.

Instead, he has been in London for three years means that he has had a permanent stay there for three years now.

I completely agree with Gustavo's answer. I just would like to refer to a quote from A Comprehensive Grammar Of The English Language, page 212:

"Because of its resultative meaning, the simple perfective can't be used with accomplishment verbs when the clause contains an adverbial of duration:

- They have been repairing the road for months. (Not: They have repaired the road for months.)

An exception to this, however, occurs where the duration adverbial applies to the resultant state itself or where the clause is negative.

- They have gone to Spain for two weeks.

Last edited by ahmed_btm

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