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Hi, this is my first time posting. I usually can find the solution online but I've gotten some mixed messages from a few people in person.

I understand semicolons when used in the following case

[sentence/clause] ; [more description]

i.e.  I ate pizza; it was pepperoni.

But can you use it to separate 1. [a term]; [definition] 2. [a premise]; [a conclusion] 3. [a conclusion]; [logical deduction]

I dislike using semicolons since they are usually unnecessary and glare at you when used where a comma would be just as good. But these cases seem like good reasons to use semicolons (if they work) for clarity and efficiency.

Thanks in advance for answering.

Last edited by Limelight
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Hello, Limelight, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

@Limelight posted:

I understand semicolons when used in the following case

[sentence/clause] ; [more description]

i.e.  I ate pizza; it was pepperoni.

Personally, I don't like that semicolon. As you must know, semicolons tend to be used in more formal sentences formed by longer coordinate clauses, which is not the case above.

@Limelight posted:

But can you use it to separate 1. [a term]; [definition] 2. [a premise]; [a conclusion] 3. [a conclusion]; [logical deduction]

Could you provide examples, please?

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

Welcome to the Grammar Exchange, Limelight.

@Limelight posted:


But can you use it to separate 1. [a term]; [definition] 2. [a premise]; [a conclusion] 3. [a conclusion]; [logical deduction]



Like Gustavo, I'd like you to give some examples. Regarding cases (2) and (3), semicolons are often used before "hence" and conjunctive adverbs like "therefore," "consequently," "accordingly" and the clauses they introduce.

Could you provide examples, please?

1. [a term]; [definition] 2. [a premise]; [a conclusion] 3. [a conclusion]; [logical deduction]

(1) This argument is entirely invalid; the premises do not logically follow to the conclusion.

(2) He was placed at the scene of the crime, no one else could have committed this act, and he had the motivation to commit it; he is guilty.

(3) The object is round; it has no corners, is smooth, and any point at the edge is equidistant from the center.   

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