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Hello,

I have come across the sentences from NPR.

''When the fighter jet crashed into these northwestern Ukrainian woods, killing its 27-year-old pilot, splintering trees and spewing fuel, it tore a gash in the forest canopy. Then it exploded. The wildfire that followed charred trees and earth, threatening two nearby villages.''

I can understang what the writer meant, but I am not sure about the grammar structure.

In my opinion, it should be like this;

''''When the fighter jet crashed into these northwestern Ukrainian woods, and the fighter jet killed its 27-year-old pilot, and  the fighter jet splintered trees and spwed fuel, it tore a gash in the forest canopy. Then it exploded. The wildfire that followed charred trees and earth, and wildfire threatened two nearby villages.''

As far as I know, we can reduce the events ıf the subject is same. However, the first event should be reduced like;

''He pulled the trigger and shot her on her head.''

''Pulling the trigger, he shot her on her head.''

But I think using reduction by ignoring event order is more practial, but I am not sure.

Could you please provide more detail about this issue, of course if I am right about my question?



Original Post

Hi, Erdal K.,

@Erdal K. posted:

''When the fighter jet crashed into these northwestern Ukrainian woods, killing its 27-year-old pilot, splintering trees and spewing fuel, it tore a gash in the forest canopy. Then it exploded. The wildfire that followed charred trees and earth, threatening two nearby villages.''

I can understang what the writer meant, but I am not sure about the grammar structure.

In my opinion, it should be like this;

''''When the fighter jet crashed into these northwestern Ukrainian woods, and the fighter jet killed its 27-year-old pilot, and  the fighter jet splintered trees and spwed fuel, it tore a gash in the forest canopy. Then it exploded. The wildfire that followed charred trees and earth, and wildfire threatened two nearby villages.''

As far as I know, we can reduce the events ıf the subject is same.

In English, we can use V-ing to refer to previous, simultaneous or subsequent actions performed by the subject of the main or a higher-level clause.

In the first sentence, there is an adverbial clause starting with "when" whose subject, "the fighter jet," is the subject of "crashed" as well as of "killing," "splintering" and "spewing," all of which are contained within the same "when"-clause, so there's nothing grammatically wrong with that.

In the second sentence, "the wildfire" is the subject of the main clause (where the main verb is "charred") and is also the subject of "threatening," so it's correct too.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

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