A statement such as "He paid me more than $ 200 last month" excludes the case that the person gave me $200 just. Is it safe to think that "above" and "below" do not include the reference points?

On the other hand,  in the phrases "between you and me", it includes the two people referred to, so I think "between $200 and $300" would also include the reference points. If so, what would be the difference between these two sets of prepositions? 

Thank you very much.

Original Post

Hi, Ken,

ken posted:

Is it safe to think that "above" and "below" do not include the reference points?

Yes. For example, when we say "above sea level" and "below sea level" to refer to altitudes or depths, surfaces at sea level -- such as beaches -- are not included. The same thing happens when we refer to temperatures above or below zero -- zero is not included in any case.

ken posted:

I think "between $200 and $300" would also include the reference points. If so, what would be the difference between these two sets of prepositions?

Yes, "between $200 and $300," as well as "between 2010 and 2020," include both ends. The difference lies, I think, in the fact that "between" is always combined with "and," and as long as the two reference points belong to the continuum referred to (numbers or years in our examples), they will be included. The reference points will not be included if what is measured has a different nature, for example: There are ten meters between you and me. (The two people taken as points of reference are not included in the distance being measured.)

Instead, "above" and "below" have a comparative value, being equivalent to "more than" and "less than."

Gustavo, 

>the reference points will not be included if what is measured has a different nature,

Informative and very interesting explanation. Thank you very much!

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