Hello,

"I met a woman......I found very intetesting."

A-which     b-whom     c-that

Original Post
Ahmed Abdelhafeez posted:

"I met a woman......I found very inte[r]esting."

A-which     b-whom     c-that

Hi, Ahmed,

You can use (b) ("whom"), (c) ("that"), or (d -- the unmentioned choice) (nothing):

(b) I met a woman whom I found very interesting.
(c) I met a woman that I found very interesting.
(d) I met a woman I found very interesting.

The only incorrect choice is (a) ("which"). In modern English, "which" is not used with human antecedents. Incidentally, you will hear and see native English speakers using "who" instead of "whom" in such sentences.

Ahmed Abdelhafeez posted:

Hello,

"I met a woman......I found very intetesting."

A-which     b-whom     c-that

Hello Ahmed, there must be a comma after a woman,......... This is what I really think. Thus, the answer is Which. Yet, if you insist on Your sentence, then I must agree with the comment of David. 

Wael Shaltoot posted:

Hello Ahmed, there must be a comma after a woman,......... This is what I really think. Thus, the answer is Which. Yet, if you insist on Your sentence, then I must agree with the comment of David. 

Hi, Wael Shaltoot,

There is no comma after "woman," and "which" is ungrammatical. Therefore, "which" is NOT the answer. I'm afraid you are wrong.

If there were a comma after "woman," the sentence would be grammatical; however, the relative clause would not modify "woman."

The sentence "I met a woman, which I found very interesting" means the speaker found it very interesting to meet a woman. It's a different meaning.

Last edited by David, Moderator
David, Moderator posted:
Wael Shaltoot posted:

Hello Ahmed, there must be a comma after a woman,......... This is what I really think. Thus, the answer is Which. Yet, if you insist on Your sentence, then I must agree with the comment of David. 

Hi, Wael Shaltoot,

There is no comma after "woman," and "which" is ungrammatical. Therefore, "which" is NOT the answer. I'm afraid you are wrong.

If there were a comma after "woman," the sentence would be grammatical; however, the relative clause would not modify "woman."

The sentence "I met a woman, which I found very interesting" means the speaker found it very interesting to meet a woman. It's a totally different meaning.

Hi David, I do know there is no comma in the main post. It is an assumption. I do know if there were a comma, then "which is the only Grammatical solution, cos in that case" which"refers to M EETING A WOMAN as an action. Really, I have come across  this sentence in an outside  book and noticed the comma, so I thought the post maker forgot it. That is all. Again, without a comma, surely Which is completely WRONG. 

Last edited by Wael Shaltoot

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