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Hi, Ahmed,

@Ahmed towab posted:

While reading a passage about adverts on the internet,I came across this sentence " Think about who has written the website. Is it a company who may be trying to sell you something?

My question is about using the relative pronoun "who" referring to "a company" How come! thanks in advance.

Just as 'company' takes a plural verb in British English (as it is a collective noun), it can be followed by the relative pronoun 'who'. However, what is common to use is 'the company that / which …'

@Ahmed towab posted:

Can this be applied to all collective nouns like government, committe, team...etc.

Yes. According to Michael Swan 3rd edition, page 519:

In British English, singular words like family, team, government, which refer to groups of people, can have either singular or plural verbs and pronouns. The team is/are going to lose. Plural forms are common when the group is seen as a collection of people doing personal things like deciding, hoping or wanting. Singular forms are more common when the group is seen as an impersonal unit. 

-My firm are wonderful. They do all they can for me.

- My firm was founded in the 18th century.

We prefer who as a relative pronoun with plural forms, and which with singular forms.

- The committee, who are hoping to announce important changes, ...

- The committee, which is elected at the annual meeting, ...

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