1- My friend told me that he ………. the visa to the USA until he had paid for it.

a doesn’t take        

b won’t take          

c hadn’t taken        

d didn’t take         

I think that 'c' is the correct answer as the verb was 'didn't take' which when reported will change into 'hadn't taken', but then one teacher told me that 'd' is the correct answer. So can anyone here help me with this sentence.

2- She told me that I ………………. due care to my work. I actually appreciate her advice.

a needn’t have given          

b could have given

c should have given          

d should give                                               

I can't make up my mind whether it's d or c.  Thanks if anyone cane give me a hand.

3- Rami wondered when the general manager ………….. to attend the next conference.

a will travel          

b would travel        

c has travelled        

d was travelling         

I am wondering if 'b' & 'd' are both possible?

From the exercises on Longman site for NewHelloEgypt. (There are no answer supplied)

Last edited by Rasha Assem
Original Post

Hello, Rasha Assem,

Personally, I had chosen not to answer your question because I was doubtful about (1). Let's wait and see what David can tell us, but I don't think any of the options work. Also, I'd say "get a visa" rather than "take a visa." I'd say the following, but I don't know if that is the intended meaning:

1a. My friend told me that he wouldn't get the visa to the USA until he had paid for it.

2- She told me that I ………………. due care to my work. I actually appreciate her advice.

In this case, I'd choose (d) "should give" to express advice about a current situation ("should have given" would express criticism for the person not having given due care to their work.)

I am wondering if 'b' & 'd' are both possible?

In the case of (3), I also think that both options are possible.

Gustavo, Contributor posted:

Personally, I had chosen not to answer your question because I was doubtful about (1). Let's wait and see what David can tell us, but I don't think any of the options work. Also, I'd say "get a visa" rather than "take a visa." I'd say the following, but I don't know if that is the intended meaning:

1a. My friend told me that he wouldn't get the visa to the USA until he had paid for it.

I like the way you've revised that sentence, Gustavo. It makes a lot more sense to me than the original sentence. In my experience with visas, it would be impossible to take a visa to a country without receiving the visa, and one would not receive the visa unless one had paid for it. So it would be pointless to say that one hadn't taken a visa to a country until one had paid for it.

That said, if we are converting the sentence "He told me, 'I didn't take the visa to the USA until I had paid for it'" to backshifted indirect reported speech, then Rasha's choice ("hadn't taken") is the correct answer. If we are converting that sentence to indirect reported speech without backshift, then Rasha's teacher's choice is the correct answer.

Rasha, you might consider asking your teacher (a) what sentence (1) is supposed to mean, (b) why anyone would want to say it, and (c) why he or she (I don't know whether your teacher is a man or a woman) doesn't want to backshift the verb. As to your question about whether you had asked too many questions in one thread, I do prefer there to be only one grammatical problem per thread.

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