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Hi, Cristi,

When "advise" means "recommend," several patterns are possible. When "advise" is followed by "that," within the "that"-clause there should be a modal indicating advisability, such as should, ought to, need to, have to, had better, etc.

You can say:

- You advised the patient that he needs to wear a mask to enter the office.

- You advised that the patient needs to wear a mask to enter the office.

- You advised the patient to wear a mask to enter the office.

- You advised wearing a mask to enter the office.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Cristi, AKA Tony C's wife

@Cristi posted:

1. Does it mean advised followed by that acts as a "reporting verb"

The verb "advise" can be classified as a reporting verb even when it is followed by an infinitive, for example:

A: Be careful, B. ⇒ A advised B to be careful.

@Cristi posted:

2. What is the difference between "enter the office" and "enter into the office?"

The verb "enter" never takes "into" when it refers to physically going into a place (enter an office, enter a restaurant, enter a museum). It only takes "into" when it is used figuratively, as in enter into a contract, enter into negotiations, enter into a conversation, etc.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi Gustavo,

Yes, I am Tony's wife Sorry for the confusion, I will get Tony C to post next time so that it's consistent and hopefully we don't bombard you with many questions as we have learn a lot from you already.

Following on your responses above,

1) so we say enter to the office, but if we use the verb "come", do I say come into the office?

2. You stated that When "advise" is followed by "that," within the "that"-clause there should be a modal indicating advisability, such as should, ought to, need to, have to, had better, etc.

What about this sentence below?

I advise him that I am still reviewing his job application. Does it mean, it is wrong because it's not followed by should, ought to, need to, have to, had better, etc.

Thank you.

@Cristi posted:

Yes, I am Tony's wife Sorry for the confusion, I will get Tony C to post next time so that it's consistent and hopefully we don't bombard you with many questions as we have learn a lot from you already.

That will not be necessary. I have already told him how you should proceed.

@Cristi posted:

1) so we say enter to the office, but if we use the verb "come", do I say come into the office?

We don't say "enter to the office" but "enter the office." "Come into the office" is correct. The restriction with "into" only applies to the verb "enter."

@Cristi posted:

2. You stated that When "advise" is followed by "that," within the "that"-clause there should be a modal indicating advisability, such as should, ought to, need to, have to, had better, etc.

What about this sentence below?

I advise him that I am still reviewing his job application. Does it mean, it is wrong because it's not followed by should, ought to, need to, have to, had better, etc.

I told you that when "advise" is used to mean "recommend" there should be a modal indicating advisability within the "that"-clause. In the sentence above, "advise" means "inform," so the modal is not necessary.

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

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