Skip to main content

I'll have to be a little long-winded to explain this question but it only applies to the bold text. Usually, when "but" is used as a conjunction, it represents a contrast or contradiction of the second independent clause to the first independent clause.

"It’s raining but I'm still going outside."

"Which" usually begins a non-restrictive clause but with the clause beginning with "which" here, "which, technically, they're not supposed to do," it seems that it has to be restrictive. The sentence "Anyway, the construction guys just drove a big truck into our driveway but I'll be home all day, so I'll give them a pass" only makes sense if the "which" clause is included. Does that make the "which" clause restrictive? Also, a relative clause describes the noun before it but in this case, it seems like "what they're not supposed to do" is describing what it is that's not supposed to be done, that is, "driving the truck into the driveway." If that's true, does the entire clause "which, technically, they're not supposed to do" modify the complete sentence "the construction guys just drove a big truck into our driveway?"



Hi everyone. Sorry about all that noise in the background. There's a bunch of construction going on at our neighbor's house or I guess I should say our ex-neighbor or maybe our future neighbor. See, what happened is... (There's a few minutes of dialogue from the speaker before construction truck drives through)

Anyway, the construction guys just drove a big truck into our driveway which technically they're not supposed to do but I'm home all day, so I'll give them a pass. The truck looks like it's filled with lumber of all sizes, two by fours, four by sixes, and one by twelves, looks like to me. fours are actually two inches by four inches?

Original Post

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×