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This type of credit is dangerous—it’s not always secured; it can have sky-high rates, and to add to that, you only have to tap a card reader in a store to use it.



I've sometimes seen the double hyphen used stylistically similarly, but I don't know if it's correct.

It seems like a colon could also work as it explains that the type of credit is dangerous, then lists dangerous things.

This type of credit is dangerous: it's not always secured; it can have sky-high interest rates, and to add to that, you only have to tap a card reader in a store to use it.

I also wonder if the sentence would be better structured without the semicolon and written with commas as a list after the colon.

This type of credit is dangerous: it's not always secured, will have sky-high interest rates, and to add to that, you only have to tap a card reader in a store to use it.

My question would be, "Am I allowed to use a comma between 'secured' and 'will'?"

Could the sentence instead be:

This type of credit is dangerous: it's not always secured and will have sky-high interest rates, and to add to that, you only have to tap a card reader in a store to use it.

Is this version incorrect because of the use of 'and' before 'and to add to that?



I know that's a lot. Thank you!

Last edited by Chop4lop
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