By 2019, they are projected to have fallen off by roughly a third since their peak in 2009.
 
I understand that the adverbial "by 2019" is not intended to modify "are prepared". Instead, it modifies "have fallen".

So I think it is intentionally fronted from the original position:

They are projected to have fallen off by roughly a third by 2019 since their peak in 2009.

Is that kind of inappropriate?

Original Post

Hi, Robby zhu,

Robby zhu posted:
By 2019, they are projected to have fallen off by roughly a third since their peak in 2009.
 
I understand that the adverbial "by 2019" is not intended to modify "are prepared". Instead, it modifies "have fallen".

So I think it is intentionally fronted from the original position:

They are projected to have fallen off by roughly a third by 2019 since their peak in 2009.

Is that kind of inappropriate?

Fronting the time adverbial is correct even if a raising verb is involved. "By 2019" does not refer to the verb "project" but to "fall off." I find your revised version, They are projected to have fallen off by roughly a third by 2019 since their peak in 2009, also correct but a bit confusing with "by 2019" surrounded by those two other adverbials. Even if fronted, the time adverbial refers to the semantically main verb, that is, to "fall off." On the Internet, you can find lots of examples with, for example, "By xxx, Y is expected to have pp ...," where the adverbial refers to the main verb expressed by the past participle, not to the verb "expect."

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