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Help me! Please!

There are many words can make a short imperative sentence by itself (ex: Run! / Look! / Sit!), can you explain to me the meaning of the below words when I use them like a short imperative sentences?

 

1 Choose!

2 Enjoy!

3 Capture!

4 Celebrate!

5 Stay!

6 Finish!

7 Follow!

8 Forget!

9 Calculate!

10 Control!

11 Count!

12 Decorate!

13 Define!

14 Divide!

15 Drag!

16 Draw!

17 Drive!

18 Drop!

19 Explain!

20 Explore!

21 Gulp!

22 Illustrate!

23 Imagine!

24 Investigate!

25 Judge!

26 Knock!

27 Leave!

28 Manage!

29 Meditate!

30 Pray!

31 Proceed!

32 Pull!

33 Push!

34 Quit!

35 Reply!

36 Revise!

37 Search!

38 Serve!

39 Steer!

40 Swing!

41 Twist!

42 Walk!

 

Thank you for all your help!

Original Post

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Hi, Kimconu,

You just have to look up those words in the dictionary and imagine telling someone to do those actions. Some of those verbs will work alone while others will require an object or some other complement, for example:

- Follow me.

- Forget it.

- Drop it.

- Judge by yourself.

Others are hard to imagine in the imperative, like Manage!

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

Hi, Kimconu,

You just have to look up those words in the dictionary and imagine telling someone to do those actions. Some of those verbs will work alone while others will require an object or some other complement, for example:

- Follow me.

- Forget it.

- Drop it.

- Judge by yourself.

Others are hard to imagine in the imperative, like Manage!

Really!

I took them from the book "English Imperative Sentences - Most Common Imperative Verbs - Manik Joshi", he said "Only ‘verb word’ can also form the imperative sentence", and then list out the words I mentioned above.

POSITIVE SENTENCES –
Calculate! Capture! Celebrate! Choose! Clap! Climb! Concentrate! Decorate! Define! Dig! Divide! ...

Thank you for your help!

Last edited by Kimconu

Hi, Kimconu—To add a little to Gustavo's response, in live spoken English, it is fairly common to hear such one-word commands where there is a sense of urgency or a desire to use truncated speech, even with strongly transitive verbs.

There are often contextual cues that clarify the intended object of a strongly transitive verb. Consider what "Wash!" would mean when uttered by a prison guard, on the one hand, and by a manager at a car wash, on the other.

In the one case, "Wash!" means "Wash yourself!" In the other, "Wash!" means "Wash the car!" Similarly, we can imagine contexts in which "Help!" means "Help me!" and other contexts in which "Help!" means "Help that person over there!"

Last edited by David, Moderator

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