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Hello,

I have a question regarding the verb pattern [ Sit / stand / lie + expression of place + gerund ].

In my English book (Mac Millan  Open Mind upper intermediate level) I've found some examples explaining the lesson, and this one was one of them:

E.g. "The crowd just sat listening to the music all afternoon."

It does not use the expression of place*. I found it a bit confusing since it has already been explained in the lesson that these verbs follow this pattern:  [ Sit / stand / lie + expression of place + gerund ].

Some presumptions: 🤔

Is it because we can understand easily  "the place" from the context or because after the verb sit we use gerund usually ( which has no relation with the lesson)?

Last edited by Meriem
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Hi, Meriem,

Above, where you said:

@Meriem posted:

E.g. "The crowd just sat listening to the music all afternoon."

It does not use the expression of time.

I understand you meant to say "the expression of place."

Actually, you don't always need an adverbial of place with those verbs. The place can be implicit, or an adverb like "there" can be used.

The main verb and the V-ing are used together to mean, in this case, that the crowd sat while they were listening, or that they listened while they were sitting (possibly in a park).

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator
@Meriem posted:

Hello,

I have a question regarding the verb pattern [ Sit / stand / lie + expression of place + gerund ].

In my English book (Mac Millan  Open Mind upper intermediate level) I've found some examples explaining the lesson, and this one was one of them:

E.g. "The crowd just sat listening to the music all afternoon."

It does not use the expression of place*. I found it a bit confusing since it has already been explained in the lesson that these verbs follow this pattern:  [ Sit / stand / lie + expression of place + gerund ].

Some presumptions: 🤔

Is it because we can understand easily  "the place" from the context or because after the verb sit we use gerund usually ( which has no relation with the lesson)?

The ing-phrase of your concern is not a gerund, but a present participle in traditional grammar.

A gerund is traditionally considered to be the "noun version" of a verb, so to speak.

Last edited by raymondaliasapollyon

The ing-phrase of your concern is not a gerund, but a present participle in traditional grammar.

A gerund is traditionally considered to be the "noun version" of a verb, so to speak.

That's why I said "V-ing." I agree that, in traditional grammar, that -ing form was considered to be a present participle, not a gerund. Compare:

1. The crowd just sat listening to the music all afternoon. ("Listening" is adverbial.)
2. The crowd listening to the music love this band. ("Listening" is adjectival.)
3. Listening to music cheers them up. ("Listening" is nominal.)

In traditional grammar, "listening" is a present participle in sentences (1) and (2), and a gerund in sentence (3).

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